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Feeding the Soul to Aid Japan

Feeding the Soul to Aid Japan


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Food and drink promotions across the U.S. that benefit Japanese disaster relief.

As the devastating aftermath of the 8.9-magnitude earthquake that hit Japan March 11th continues to unfold, chefs and mixologists across the U.S. are offering support the best way they know how, through special promotions and fundraising efforts. These restaurants are collecting funds to aid disaster relief efforts:

National
• Sprinkles Cupcakery will donate all proceeds from their Red Cross Red Velvet cupcakes to benefit relief efforts in Japan.
• Many of SushiSamba's executive chefs hail from Japan. The restaurant is serving a variety of Japan Relief rolls to benefit disaster efforts. Locations across New York, Chicago, Miami, and Las Vegas will offer unique creations and donate all proceeds from them to the Red Cross during March.
• Bakers are organizing a national bake sale on April 2nd to raise money for relief. Participants include L.A.'s Black Cat Bakery, Barista in Portland, and SPQR in San Francisco.

New York
• Martha Stewart and Wynton Marsalis are joining the owners of EN Japanese Brasserie for Love for Japan, a benefit taking place at the restaurant on Wednesday.
Terroir started offering Yoshi Fried Chicken and the Yoshiyuki Nonaka Cocktail at all of their locations in honor of Yoshi Nonaka, a line cook at their sister restaurant, Hearth. Proceeds from both of these items will be donated to relief efforts.

Boston
• Through April 1st Metropolitan Restaurant Group's four Boston-area locations will donate proceeds from their Tokyo Burger to the American Red Cross Japan Disaster Relief effort.

Waikiki, Hawaii
• Tomorrow, Chef Masaharu Morimoto, a Japanese native, will hold a benefit fundraiser at Morimoto in Waikiki.

Philadelphia
• The Shangri-La Inn in Bala Cynwyd will donate all proceeds from their lunch and dinner service today to Peace Winds, an NGO specializing in disaster relief.

Sacramento
• Mikuni Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar is offering the "Rescue Roll" at all of their locations throughout March. All proceeds will be donated directly to the American Red Cross.

New Orleans
• Mesón 923 is offering two Japanese Earthquake Relief specials: a Louisiana-inspired ramen and a lemongrass sake gimlet. Proceeds from both will be donated to the Japanese Red Cross.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


33 Ways to Feed Your Soul

Most of us are magnesium-deficient, especially when under stress, says herbal expert and consultant Lynda LeMole, former president and owner of Traditional Medicinals tea company. A magnesium deficiency can put a damper on energy capacity and let depression gain a toehold. Fortunately our skin absorbs magnesium from bathwater containing Epsom salts, aka magnesium sulfate.

LeMole suggests adding lavender to the bath and enjoying candlelight during your soak. “Our skin is our largest organ of absorption and elimination, so in hot water we discharge the negative and open to the healing, relaxing lavender,” she explains. LeMole adds that absorbing magnesium through soaks and taking oral magnesium supplements “can go a long way in relaxing our fried and exhausted nerves.”

Or consider a warming mustard bath. Fans of British novels may be aware of these restorative baths, a traditional English remedy for reducing stress and aches as well as ridding the body of toxins, says Cleveland Clinic psychologist Susan Albers, Psy.D., New York Times best-selling author of Eat Q. Her recipe: In a bowl, mix ¼ cup mustard seed powder, ¼ cup Epsom salts, ¼ cup baking soda and 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Pour in a hot bath and soak.

For a further boost after your bath, massage magnesium oil into the skin.


Watch the video: Can You Feed Yourself in Japan With No Japanese? (November 2022).