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Grilled Corn and Poblano Guacamole

Grilled Corn and Poblano Guacamole


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Heat a gas grill to medium or light a charcoal fire and let it burn until medium hot and the coals are covered with gray ash.

Lightly brush both sides of the onion slices with oil, sprinkle with salt, and lay on the grill. Oil the corn and lay it beside the onion along with the poblano (no oil needed). When the onion slices are browned on one side, 4 or 5 minutes, flip them and grill the other side. Turn the corn regularly until evenly browned, about 5 minutes. Roast the poblano on the hottest part of the grill for 5 to 7 minutes, turning it until evenly blackened.

Let the roasted vegetables cool. Chop the onion into ¼-inch pieces. Cut the kernels from the corn (you need about ¾ cup). Rub the blackened skin off the poblano, pull out and discard the stem and seed pod, tear open the flesh, and briefly rinse to remove stray seeds and bits of blackened skin; cut into ¼-inch pieces.

Cut the avocados in half, running a knife around the pit from top to bottom and back up again. Twist the halves in opposite directions to release the pit from one side. Scoop out the pit, then scoop the flesh from 1 avocado into a large bowl. Scoop the flesh from the other two avocados onto a cutting board and cut into ½-inch pieces. With an old-fashioned potato masher, large fork, or the back of a large spoon, thoroughly mash the avocado that’s in the bowl.

Scoop the diced avocado into the bowl along with the grilled onion, corn, poblano, and 2 tablespoons of the fresh cheese. Sprinkle with the lime and epazote, then gently stir the mixture to distribute everything evenly.

Taste and season with salt, usually about 1 teaspoon. Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the guacamole and refrigerate. When you’re ready to serve, scoop it into a serving bowl and sprinkle with the remaining cheese.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.


  • Always start with the freshest corn possible. As soon as corn is picked off the stalk, it starts to lose its natural sugars and convert them to starch. So, a cob picked the same morning you are going to grill will be sweeter (and less mealy) than a cob picked a day or two before. The best way to guarantee fresh corn is to pick up a few ears from your local farmers market or farm stand. Look for husks that are tightly wrapped and green. Get more tips for choosing the best ear of corn.
  • To soak or not to soak, that is the question. Some folks believe you can get a little extra steam power by soaking corn in water for 15 minutes before grilling.
  • Want that grilled corn flavor but don&apost want to gnaw the cob? No problem! After grilling your cob, hold it vertically over a plate or bowl with the pointed end down, and use a small, sharp knife to scrape the kernels from the cob. Serve it as is or toss it into a grilled corn salad.

There are three delicious (and deliciously easy) ways to grill corn on the cob. No matter which method you choose, always start by preheating your grill to medium heat and lightly oiling the grates. How long to grill corn on the cob depends on the grilling method you choose and how hot your grill is. In general, you grill the corn until it&aposs perfectly tender, turning occasionally, somewhere between 10 and 15 minutes. Always let the corn cool for a minute or two before you eat it, and offer extra butter, salt, and any of your other favorite condiments on the side.

Let&aposs get grilling – it&aposs time to choose your favorite technique.

1. Grilled Corn on the Cob in the Husk

Try this recipe: Corn on the Grill

Grilling corn while it&aposs still wrapped in the husk will help keep in moisture, resulting in a juicier ear of corn. Whether you remove the silk before or after grilling is a matter of personal preference. To remove the silk before grilling, pull back — but don&apost remove — the husk, pull off the silk, and smooth the husk back up. Or, simply peel the whole darn thing after grilling. Don&apost be alarmed: The husk will char completely but the tender kernels inside will steam perfectly and the silk will come off cleanly.

2. Grilled Corn on the Cob in Foil

Try this recipe: Sweet Grilled Corn

A little more work at the beginning will make it less of a mess at the end. Simply remove the husk and silk from the corn (this is a great activity for kids to help with, especially if you are outside) and wrap the corn completely in heavy aluminum foil. If you like, smear the cob with a little flavored butter, herbs, or salt before wrapping. The best part of this method is that the aluminum foil helps keep the corn warmer, longer, which is especially helpful if you&aposre cooking for a crowd.

3. Grilled Corn on the Cob Without Husks

Try this recipe: Mexican Grilled Corn

For super tasty bits of char and caramelization on the cob, simply shuck the corn and cook it directly on the grill. Because it&aposs not protected by a husk or a sheet of foil, the corn will cook a bit quicker, so watch it closely and turn it frequently. For this recipe, Chef John briefly boils the husked corn and then grills it for a few minutes until it&aposs beautifully caramelized. To give it a spicy Mexican-style finish, he coats the corn with a flavorul mixture of mayo, lime juice, chile powder, and smoked paprika before serving. Watch the video to see how to make this recipe.