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Healthy Colcannon

Healthy Colcannon


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Not only was this traditional dish a treat for the people of Ireland, but it was said to satiate the fairies and goblins that roamed the evergreen hills. The traditional recipe is a flavorful blend of potato, cabbage, and kale, but ours takes on a healthier theme, using cauliflower instead of potatoes.

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower
  • 4 Tablespoons butter, separated
  • 1/2 Cup cream cheese, softened
  • 2 Tablespoons sour cream
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 Teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 Cup lightly packed dried kale
  • 1 Teaspoon dried parsley
  • 4 Tablespoons light half-and-half
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Servings6

Calories Per Serving188

Folate equivalent (total)60µg15%


Healthy Irish Colcannon





With St. Patrick’s Day quickly approaching, I thought it would be fun to give you some cleaned up versions of some classic Irish favorites.To start, I wanted to put a healthy spin on an Irish potato dish known as colcannon, which typically contains white potatoes, milk, butter, cabbage, bacon, scallions and parsley. Obviously, this isn’t the healthiest combo, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy a modified, healthier version! My take on colcannon involves subbing out white potatoes for sweet potatoes, regular milk for coconut milk, coconut oil for butter, and kale for cabbage for a more nutrient dense dish.





This healthy take on colcannon makes a delicious side to any meat or veggies, or you can just eat it on its’ own like I did if you are a sweet potato feen like myself. This is a simple, delicious and nutritious way to get into the Irish spirit!

I plan on doing a few more Irish recipes throughout the month, so let me know in the comments if you’re looking for a clean eating version of something in particular! I’d be happy to take a stab at it


Traditional Irish Colcannon

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 4 to 6
Amount per serving
Calories 127
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2g 3%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 5mg 2%
Sodium 47mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 24g 9%
Dietary Fiber 3g 11%
Total Sugars 2g
Protein 3g
Vitamin C 19mg 94%
Calcium 42mg 3%
Iron 1mg 8%
Potassium 650mg 14%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Colcannon is a favorite Irish recipe made of potatoes, dairy, and cabbage or kale. Although usually associated with Saint Patrick's Day, colcannon is actually most seen on Irish tables on Halloween nights when the cook hides little trinkets in the mash, each representing fortune, poverty, or perhaps the chance of a future marriage.

There are as many recipes for this mashed potato dish as there are cooks in Ireland. Each household and region has a favorite way of cooking the colcannon. What seems to be commonplace in all of them is the presence of generous amounts of butter, potatoes and dairy, and cabbage or kale as the vegetable of choice to add volume and flavor to this tasty preparation.

For the perfect colcannon, choose floury potatoes, as these have more starch and less water and produce a fluffier mash. Varieties like Rosamunda, Desiree, Melody, Blue Congo, King Edward, Maris Piper, or Early Puritan are excellent potatoes for this dish. Serve the colcannon with boiled ham, Irish bacon, corned beef, Irish stew, or lamb chops for a hearty and flavorful true Irish meal.


Colcannon Soup Recipe For a Healthy Way to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

Tomorrow we celebrate St. Patrick's Day, the day of honoring the patron saint of Ireland. This day has become synonymous with green beer, greasy food and loud music. But don't let that pressure you into having an unhealthy experience on this holiday. Instead try our Colcannon soup recipe, a healthy staple in Irish homes for hundreds of years.

This classic soup combines mashed potatoes and cabbage or kale to create a warm, creamy delightful soup. There's potatoes, butter, kale or cabbage (or both) and stock to make it a soup and it's the best potato soup ever!

Today I used red cabbage because it was what I had on hand and because it is one of the healthiest vegetables we can eat. Here are a few nutritional benefits of red cabbage:

  • Cabbage contains antioxidants, glutamine and works as an anti-inflammatory, making it a cancer-preventing food.
  • It is also an excellent source of Vitamin C and a good source of Vitamin A.
  • It also lowers cholesterol levels and aids in digestion.

In this colcannon soup recipe, we mix the mashed potatoes in with chopped red cabbage, green onions, stock, and lots of butter.

I tried to make it look as pretty as I could (honestly). This soup will fill you up, and make you feel the luck of the Irish on this St. Patrick's Day.


What is Colcannon?

Colcannon is an Irish winter vegetable stew.

It hails from Northern Ireland and is traditionally made with potatoes, milk, cabbage, kale and butter. It is SUPER budget friendly.

Many times families will add bits of bacon or ham allowing the vegetables to stretch the meat so that everyone is satisfied by the end of the meal. My grandma normally served Colcannon as a side with roast beef or ham steaks. But it pairs well with just about anything.

My dad wasn’t a fan of colcannon as he liked his potatoes plain with butter and only ate limited veggies. Us kids however loved dishes like this because we rarely got them.


Colcannon

Colcannon is basically the Irish version of loaded spuds, and we're into it.

Despite what you might think, Irish fare extends beyond corned beef, soda bread and green beer (er&mdash that last one is probably American). Everyone knows that Ireland is famous for its potatoes, but if you haven&rsquot tried this particular Irish mashed potato recipe, you&rsquore seriously missing out.

What is Colcannon?

Colcannon potatoes are similar to the mash you know and love, with some green veggies stirred in for some extra Irish flair (and nutrients!). This recipe includes leeks, cabbage, kale and scallions (and a healthy pat of butter) to basically make this starch-vegetable combo a full meal in itself. It makes the perfect side dish for any holiday meal, or cozy comfort food for chilly winter days. And of course, it&rsquos an absolute must if you&rsquore planning your St. Patrick&rsquos Day menu, whether you serve it with green beer or not.

There are many ways to make Colcannon: Some recipes use just kale or all cabbage, others supplement with root vegetables like parsnips in addition to potatoes &mdash or add other tweaks like sautéed onions or a topping of cheese. Adapt the version below according to your preferences or what you need to use up in the fridge, and prepare to taste a recipe that&rsquos sure to become your family&rsquos new St. Patrick's day food tradition. Don't miss out on more of our favorite St. Patrick's Day recipes, including Potato Leek Soup, Parsnip and Potato Mash, Cheddar-Beer Fondue and Roast Pork and Sweet Potatoes With Spicy Cabbage.


  1. Put the potatoes into a large pan and cover with water. Bring to the boil over a high heat, then simmer for about 20 minutes until soft.
  2. When soft, strain and press through a drum sieve with the butter. Season with sea salt.
  3. Meanwhile, bring the milk to the boil in a small pan, add the spring onions and simmer for 4–5 minutes until the onions are tender, then fold into the potatoes.
  4. Check the seasoning and finally fold in the chopped parsley.

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Preparation

Step 1

Cover potatoes with water in a small pot season with salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat and simmer until a paring knife slides easily through the flesh, 30–40 minutes. Drain, let cool slightly, and peel.

Step 2

Meanwhile, melt 4 Tbsp. butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add leeks and cook, stirring frequently, until very soft, 8–10 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring frequently, until garlic is fragrant and leeks are just beginning to brown around the edges, about 3 minutes longer. Add 1 cup cabbage and cook, stirring constantly, until wilted. Add milk and cream and bring to a simmer.

Step 3

Add potatoes and remaining 1 cup cabbage, then coarsely mash with a potato masher. Season with salt and pepper.

Step 4

Transfer colcannon to a large serving bowl. Top with remaining 2 Tbsp. butter and sprinkle with scallion.

How would you rate Colcannon?

It looks like albino dog poop

Loos worse than my dogs kibble So much. Butter May aswell have just eaten a block of butter

To the reviewer who thought no one in Ireland would use cream I present this 19th century folk song that was in the Guardian article about colcannon. “Did you ever eat colcannon when ’twas made with yellow cream, And the kale and praties blended like the picture in a dream? Did you ever take a forkful, and dip it in the lake Of the heather-flavoured butter that your mother used to make?”

I have never had Colcannon before - what a comfort treat! Even though I have 1/2 Irish blood in me veins (my great grandfather's sir name was White and my mother's maiden name Beeghly) and 1/4 Scottish (my great grandmother's name was Campbell/Elder) I never had Colcannon or the Scottish version of the same dish Rumbledethumps. (English version is Bubble and Squeak.) Thank me lucky Stars I stumbled across this recipe. Whilst it be one of the tastiest things I ever had me thinks the remaining 1/4 of me hailing from Bavaria kicked it out of park by adding sliced Bratwurst & Kielbasa. Three words is all I have to say YUM! YUM! YUM!

I like this take but I think mine’s better, because it’s my mom’s recipe who’s Irish from Connemara. A fluffier version but just as buttery. Use russet potatoes, peel and dice in 12” chunks. Cover potatoes with water in a small pot season with salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to Med and simmer until a paring knife slides easily through the middle and cracks the chunk. Before you drain the spuds, steam a head of chopped curly kale (remove stalks) on top of these spuds for the last few mins of cooking time, watch the colour it should be green and glossy and bright. Chop 2 or 3 scallions into rough pieces while kale steams. While potato chunks are steaming hot mash with a regular masher and when mashed and fluffy mash in just under a stick of kerrygold salty butter and a large tsp of maldon sea salt and the scallions. Serve with grilled bacon rashers, or a yummy sossy from the butcher and chef brown sauce (if you can find it or import it from ireland). Less steps and dishes, this is one of our rotating weekly dinners!

Deeply satisfying is how I would describe this dish. My family absolutely loved it! Easily one of our favorites.

Loved this recipe. I had a TON of potatoes and cabbage on hand (bc. IDK. pandemic shopping) and needed inspiration. Just in time, I saw Chris' Colcannon recipe on Instagram. Boom. This was DELICIOUS. Maybe I should have made something to go with it. but honestly, just eating it with a spoon right out of the bowl, during quarantine, is a comforting hug. Would definitely make this again.

No one in Ireland would ever but cream in colcannon, never mind cream and milk? Don’t think I like the look of this weird potato soup.

This was great! I needed to use up some potatoes, but i also had some frozen cauliflower mash, so I mixed the two. I also just had traditional cabbage. But it is so delicious. Made this for Quarantine Easter!

Wanted to try something new for Christmas. Got this recipe quite late, the stores were closed on Christmas Day for the Savoy cabbage. In a stroke of luck, I had a bag of Brussels sprouts. I sliced and used as cabbage, then followed the recipe. Let me tell you, this side dish Surely delighted everyone.

I made this dish on Monday. This is kind of like a thick potato leek soup. I followed the recipe with one minor change, I tripled the garlic. Never too much garlic! Everyone really liked it and I'm making it again tomorrow for a dinner with friends. Have added this dish to my rotation.

Delicious and a great alternative to our usual boiled potatoes, cabbage, carrots and onions to go with our corned beef. The only change I made was to sub the savoy cabbage with napa since the store didn't have savoy. This may become a regular side - not just for St. Patrick's day!

i grew up with *Jewish Colcannon* -- Spinach and Potatoes. a can of chopped spinach added to hot, buttery, mashed potatoes, seasoned with plenty of salt, milk added, then all mixed together. nowadays, i use Russets, roast them -- SKIN ON -- and chop ɾm up with the skins. then i add the spinach, butter, salt, and cream instead of milk, and usually more butter. it's heavenly.

No leftovers with this foolproof dish! I made it using regular white cabbage and it was just as delicious.

Well, this is pretty darn fabulous. The leeks and Savoy cabbage kick it up from ordinary to great. I’ve made colcannon many times before but this recipe is by far the best.


Recipes

Irish mashed potatoes mixed with kale and bacon, a great creamy, delicious side dish!

Place the potatoes in a medium saucepan covered in salted water. Cover and bring to a boil. When the potatoes are half cooked, drain off about 1/2 of the water, replace the lid and continue to cook until tender. Meanwhile, combine the milk and shallot in a small pot and bring to a simmer. Remove the stems of the kale and blanch the leave very quickly in boiling water (traditionally in Ireland the kale is blanched in water they keep for boiling bacon. To achieve this same taste add 2 strips of bacon to your blanching water). Set the cooked kale aside. When the potatoes are cooked, drain the water and remove the skins. Mash the potatoes in a large bowl and add enough hot milk to make them nice and creamy. Add the kale and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately with the butter melting over the top.

  • 1 lb kale
  • 3 lb Yukon gold potatoes
  • 2 slices bacon (optional)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 shallot, finely minced
  • 4 Tbsp butter
  • Kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper

Irish mashed potatoes mixed with kale and bacon, a great creamy, delicious side dish!

Place the potatoes in a medium saucepan covered in salted water. Cover and bring to a boil. When the potatoes are half cooked, drain off about 1/2 of the water, replace the lid and continue to cook until tender. Meanwhile, combine the milk and shallot in a small pot and bring to a simmer. Remove the stems of the kale and blanch the leave very quickly in boiling water (traditionally in Ireland the kale is blanched in water they keep for boiling bacon. To achieve this same taste add 2 strips of bacon to your blanching water). Set the cooked kale aside. When the potatoes are cooked, drain the water and remove the skins. Mash the potatoes in a large bowl and add enough hot milk to make them nice and creamy. Add the kale and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately with the butter melting over the top.