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Oklahoma Wine Plan Draws Opposition

Oklahoma Wine Plan Draws Opposition


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Merchants and anti-addiction groups oppose selling wine in state grocery stores

Groups protest the possibility of selling wine in Oklahoma grocery stores.

A group seeking to allow the sale of wine in Oklahoma grocery stores is facing staunch opposition from retail liquor merchants and anti-addiction groups as they petition for support. Oklahomans for Modern Laws filed a petition that seeks a statewide vote on the expansion of wine sales in the state.

Those opposing the move suggest that it is detrimental for people who are battling addiction. They claim it will make it more difficult for individual retail liquor merchants to operate with such competition. The move to offer wine in grocery stores is an attempt to make the product more accessible to consumers by offering it in both grocery stores and retail liquor stores.

“We’re not advocating a return to prohibition,” said Executive Director of Fighting Addiction Through Education, Jim Priest. But alcohol is already the most abused substance in the state and increasing the number of retail outlets will contribute to more abuse and underage drinking, Priest said in an interview with the Associated Press.

In order to have the issue placed on the November ballot, the group must collect over 155,000 signatures from registered voters. If the petition goes through, this will be the largest change to Oklahoma liquor laws since the repeal of Prohibition in 1959.


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James


How To Start Your Own Wine Shop

If you love wine, you may have toyed with the idea of opening your own shop. What better way to make a living than to taste and discover new wines, chat up customers and recommend favorite bottles?

Not so fast. A passion for wine doesn’t necessarily translate into a successful career selling it.

“I think people just think it’s kind of fun and easy and chill, but you have to remember, you have to bust your butt to make money in a retail store,” says Sarah Pierre, owner of 3 Parks Wine Shop in Atlanta. “It’s not like you’re selling wine and all of a sudden you’re making a lot of money. That’s not the case at all. There are a ton of sleepless nights trying to figure it all out.”

Pierre debuted 3 Parks in 2013, after the opportunity arose to buy an existing, but stagnating wine shop. The store’s previous owner had opened up about six or seven months prior, but didn’t enjoy much success.

With a background in hospitality, Pierre’s expertise and dedication formed a recipe for success. Now, more than seven years in, 3 Parks has a loyal customer base, and Pierre has become integral to her community.

“Study your butt off, talk to as many people as you can, really understand the market. Understand who your customers are going to be and what they might want.” —Sarah Pierre, 3 Parks Wine Shop

The pandemic has forced many to enjoy wine at home, which has brought an uptick in support for her shop.

“There’s going to be a lot of retailers popping up because of what this pandemic has done,” says Pierre. “Everyone was reaching out [at the beginning of the pandemic] and they were finding their local retailers, you know? Some people have to travel like 30, 45 minutes to get to a local retailer, which isn’t local. We’ve now realized that there’s a need to have some more shops popping up and providing this service for people.”

Thank You! We've received your email address, and soon you will start getting exclusive offers and news from Wine Enthusiast.

Richard Garcia and his partners, Jamie and Liz Zoeller, thought for a year about opening a natural wine shop in Kansas City, Missouri. As Garcia faced unemployment at his restaurant job, the trio decided to go for it. Big Mood Natural Wines opened in August.

“My advice would be to just trust yourself,” says Garcia. “Don’t listen to all the people who tell you that you can’t do this. You can. It’s scary and it’s really hard, but if you’re willing to work for it, then just pull the Band-Aid off and do it.”

If you’ve dreamed about your own wine shop, here’s some advice from successful owners across the country on how to do it well.

Miles White and Femi Oyediran, co-owners of Graft Wine Shop in Charleston, South Carolina / Photo by Olivia Rae James