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How to Pair Oysters and Wine

How to Pair Oysters and Wine


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We discuss the best ways to make these two favorites complement each other

Oysters and wine are both crowd pleasers on their own. But when paired together they can make an even better combination! There is a method to pairing them together, and so we talked to Kersten Krall Walz of Stark Wine and Samuel Keller of Brooklyn Oyster party to get a sense of how best to combine oysters and wine.

Walz says to start simple: “I think one of the main things you want to keep in mind is you don’t want the wine to overpower the oyster or the mignonette sauce that it is with. So what you want is a simple flavor profile. You don’t want too many things going on, and you also want high acidity so it can balance the brine.”

Keller suggests knowing where your oysters come from, “Oysters are products of their environment... So it depends on the salt water, the area they grew in. All East Coast oysters are going to be pretty briney.” Howeve,r he doesn’t think that this means you should only stick to one oyster if you are only pairing with one wine. “I always suggest that people switch it up, try the different flavor profiles... Go with the least briney to start and then up the brine.”

For specifics, Walz thinks generally that Muscadets go well with oysters; and from her own collection she prefers the Stark Thirst, which is a dry un-oaked chardonnay.

For more watch the video above! And if you like a little bit of sustainability with your oysters and wine, find out more about how Stark Thirst is donating 10 percent of their profits to WaterAid on their website.


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Oyster Dressing Red Wine Vinegar. ¼ cup red wine vinegar 1 large or 2 small shallots, very finely chopped how to make it to prepare the oysters, discard any that have opened and do not close immediately when tapped on the work surface. Peel and mince 1 small shallot and stir it into 1/2 cup cider vinegar, along with 1 to 2 tablespoons brown sugar, 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoons red chili flakes, and salt to taste.

Take your salad recipes to the next level with a delicious homemade dressing, red wine vinegar dressing recipes could help. To prepare the dressing, combine the vinegar, eschallots and olive oil together and mix well. ¼ cup red wine vinegar 1 large or 2 small shallots, very finely chopped how to make it to prepare the oysters, discard any that have opened and do not close immediately when tapped on the work surface. It's simple, delicious, and brings out the natural, fresh flavor of your raw oysters. 1 tablespoon coarsely ground white or black peppercorns (vary amount according to taste) 1/2 cup white or red wine vinegar

Creamy Fetared Wine Vinegar Dressing | Just A Pinch Recipes from lh3.googleusercontent.com Bottled salad dressing can be convenient but its expensive and often full of salt, sugar, and chemical additives. Salt and freshly ground black pepper. Oysters on ice with shallots, red wine vinegar, and lemon raw oysters are one of those shellfish that you either love or hate. Mix in green onions, shallots, garlic and black pepper. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

It's amazing on raw oysters, but also truly shines when drizzled over grilled oysters.

Add the red wine vinegar and mix well. Spoon over 12 oysters and garnish with a few coriander leaves. This red wine vinaigrette recipe goes nicely on salad greens, pasta salad or bean salad. Add a little black pepper and stir to combine. Oyster dressing

red wine vinegar and shallots £ 1.50 beautiful with freshly shucked oysters, simply spoon over the succulent meats before devouring the delectable morsels. Method for the red wine vinegar dressing, combine 1½ teaspoons finely chopped french shallots or red onion with 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil and freshly ground black pepper in a bowl. Vinegar, salt, pepper, and shallots. Oysters with chile, ginger, and rice wine vinegar: It's amazing on raw oysters, but also truly shines when drizzled over grilled oysters. This classic mignonette dressing is handmade here To make a mignonette granita just put in the freezer, let it rest for about 30 minutes, then stir it and put it back. 1 tablespoon coarsely ground white or black peppercorns (vary amount according to taste) 1/2 cup white or red wine vinegar Method oysters with red wine vinaigrette 1 to prepare the dressing, combine the vinegar, eschallots and olive oil together and mix well.

Season to taste with additional salt, if. It's simple, delicious, and brings out the natural, fresh flavor of your raw oysters. Salt and freshly ground black pepper. Method for the red wine vinegar dressing, combine 1½ teaspoons finely chopped french shallots or red onion with 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil and freshly ground black pepper in a bowl. 1 tablespoon coarsely ground white or black peppercorns (vary amount according to taste) 1/2 cup white or red wine vinegar

Greek Red Wine Vinaigrette | Recipe | Red wine vinaigrette . from i.pinimg.com 2 place oysters onto serving plate. Spoon a little dressing over each oyster and serve immediately. A salad is really only as good as its dressing.the choice of how to dress a salad makes a big difference. Red wine vinegar is not as tart as other vinegars, so you can use a bit more compared to other vinaigrettes. For all oysters, be careful to keep all the liquid present naturally in the oyster.

It's simple, delicious, and brings out the natural, fresh flavor of your raw oysters.

Add a little black pepper and stir to combine. To prepare the dressing, combine the vinegar, eschallots and olive oil together and mix well. There are only four ingredients here: Method for the red wine vinegar dressing, combine 1½ teaspoons finely chopped french shallots or red onion with 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil and freshly ground black pepper in a bowl. To serve, place the freshly shucked oysters on a bed of rock salt. So simple… finely chop the shallots and red onion, the finer the better. Oyster dressing

red wine vinegar and shallots £ 1.50 beautiful with freshly shucked oysters, simply spoon over the succulent meats before devouring the delectable morsels. Season the dressing with salt and pepper, and spoon over oysters. Mix together thoroughly and put a small amount into each oyster. 2 place oysters onto serving plate. 12 large pacific oysters shucked Salt and freshly ground black pepper. The vinaigrette can be adapted for any number of oysters and can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator.

Remove from the heat once the sugar has dissolved and wait for the mixture to cool completely. Spoon a little dressing over each oyster and serve immediately. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes. A bit of fish sauce is good, too. It can bring all the flavors of the salad ingredients to life or it can drown them out completely.

Classic Kale & Chickpea Salad with Red Wine Vinegar . from i.pinimg.com Place the sugar and red wine vinegar in a small saucepan over gentle heat. Place olive oil, red wine vinegar, sugar, dijon mustard, garlic, and salt into a sealed mason jar or tupperware container and shake until the oil and vinegar have fully combined. Spoon the dressing over the oysters, and serve with a lemon wedge if you like. So simple… finely chop the shallots and red onion, the finer the better. 0.5 teaspoon rice wine vinegar

Season the dressing with salt and pepper, and spoon over oysters.

So simple… finely chop the shallots and red onion, the finer the better. A bit of fish sauce is good, too. It's simple, delicious, and brings out the natural, fresh flavor of your raw oysters. The vinaigrette can be adapted for any number of oysters and can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator. A salad is really only as good as its dressing.the choice of how to dress a salad makes a big difference. Mix together thoroughly and put a small amount into each oyster. Method oysters with red wine vinaigrette 1 to prepare the dressing, combine the vinegar, eschallots and olive oil together and mix well. Season the dressing with salt and pepper, and spoon over oysters. Stir vinegar and salt in medium bowl until salt dissolves. Bottled salad dressing can be convenient but its expensive and often full of salt, sugar, and chemical additives. Peel and mince 1 small shallot and stir it into 1/2 cup cider vinegar, along with 1 to 2 tablespoons brown sugar, 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoons red chili flakes, and salt to taste. I also like my oysters au natural with just a squeeze of lemon, but variety is the spice of life, and this makes an. To serve, place the freshly shucked oysters on a bed of rock salt.

Place them in a bowl and cover with the vinegar and season. To serve, place the freshly shucked oysters on a bed of rock salt. Raspberries, coarsely ground black pepper, kosher salt, ice, red wine vinegar and 2 more oysters with thyme mignonette garlic and zest sugar, fresh thyme leaves, shallot, rock salt, oysters, rice wine vinegar and 3 more mignonette sauce for oysters 3catsfoodie.com 12 large pacific oysters shucked Season to taste with additional salt, if.

Take your salad recipes to the next level with a delicious homemade dressing, red wine vinegar dressing recipes could help. 1 tablespoon coarsely ground white or black peppercorns (vary amount according to taste) 1/2 cup white or red wine vinegar Stir vinegar and salt in medium bowl until salt dissolves. 2 place oysters onto serving plate. Mix in green onions, shallots, garlic and black pepper.

2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots or sweet onions Season with a little fish sauce so the mix is a little salty. Mix in green onions, shallots, garlic and black pepper. 5 tablespoons red wine vinegar. It can be made several days ahead and kept in the fridge.

Place them in a bowl and cover with the vinegar and season. 1 spring onion, sliced finely to garnish Oysters on ice with shallots, red wine vinegar, and lemon raw oysters are one of those shellfish that you either love or hate. Place olive oil, red wine vinegar, sugar, dijon mustard, garlic, and salt into a sealed mason jar or tupperware container and shake until the oil and vinegar have fully combined. Raspberries, coarsely ground black pepper, kosher salt, ice, red wine vinegar and 2 more oysters with thyme mignonette garlic and zest sugar, fresh thyme leaves, shallot, rock salt, oysters, rice wine vinegar and 3 more mignonette sauce for oysters 3catsfoodie.com

Method for the red wine vinegar dressing, combine 1½ teaspoons finely chopped french shallots or red onion with 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil and freshly ground black pepper in a bowl. Infuse 10cm konbu in a bottle of 750ml rice wine vinegar for added flavour. ¼ cup red wine vinegar 1 large or 2 small shallots, very finely chopped how to make it to prepare the oysters, discard any that have opened and do not close immediately when tapped on the work surface. To make the dressing, combine the shallots, red wine vinegar and black pepper in a bowl and stir to combine. 2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots or sweet onions

There are only four ingredients here:

Mix in green onions, shallots, garlic and black pepper.

This red wine vinaigrette recipe goes nicely on salad greens, pasta salad or bean salad.

A salad is really only as good as its dressing.the choice of how to dress a salad makes a big difference.

This is definitely a classic you'll want to bring back again and again.


1. Muscadet

Muscadet is a difficult wine to pin down for many, but it also happens to be one of the most classic oyster pairings you can expect to stumble upon. No matter what bottle you open, you can expect it to be quite bright and crisp, which is exactly what oysters call for. Hailing from the Loire Valley region of France, the wine is actually made from a grape called Melon de Bourgogne, which is grown in the area and typically called Melon by locals. While Muscadet can be consumed fresh, the best on the market are those which have been aged “on the lees,” or yeast of the wine. This adds not only a biscuity flavor, but also textural viscosity that wouldn’t otherwise be present.

One of the best things about Muscadet is that stellar examples of the style can be had for under $20 a bottle, meaning you can have an oyster celebration fit for a king on a peasant’s budget. If you’ve never had this pairing before, start here before moving on to the next wines on our list.


Oysters Four Ways

  • 1 dozen natural (raw) oysters, shucked (or unopen if you wish to shuck them yourself – see my previous post on oysters)
  • 2 lemons, quartered
  • 1 small piece ginger, grated to make 1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 2 spring onions, sliced finely
  • 1 teaspoon light soy sauce
  • 1/2 slice prosciutto
  • 1.5 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated palm sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • 0.5 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1/4 – 1/3 Birds Eye chilli, diced as small as you can (remove seeds for less heat)
  • 0.5 teaspoon lime juice
  • 1 spring onion, sliced finely to garnish
  1. For all oysters, be careful to keep all the liquid present naturally in the oyster.
  2. For natural, serve 3 oysters on a bed of rock salt with lemon
  3. For Chinese style, mix ginger, spring onions and soy sauce in a small bowl and then dribble over 3 oysters. Place under a hot grill — watch like a hawke, do not walk away — and grill until top of oyster is browning nicely.
  4. For Kiplatrick, dice prosciutto and then share amongst 3 oysters. Dribble Worcestershire sauce on top and then place under a hot grill — watch like a hawke, do not walk away — until prosciutto is crisp and oyster is browning nicely.
  5. For Thai style, mix palm sugar, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, chilli and lime juice in a small bowl. Dribble over 3 natural oysters and then garnish with spring onions and/or coriander. Re: the chilli. Start with a tiny amount first — even just a few teensy diced pieces — and then add more if you need to.

How to shuck an oyster:

Place oyster cup-side down on a flat surface secured by a folded dish towel. Insert oyster knife into the hinge. Applying gentle pressure, wriggle the blade back and forth until the oyster pops. Run the blade flat over the meat to sever the muscle connecting the top shell. Detach the muscle under the meat with a knife, taking care not to release the oyster’s juices. Serve.

Buy lobsters that are alive and kicking—literally. The more a lobster thrashes and bucks when picked up, the fresher it is. Lobsters, like crabs, begin to molt in the summer, shedding their hard shells and developing larger soft shells. Soft-shelled lobsters can be waterlogged, yielding a lower meat-to-shell ratio than those with hard shells. However, they’re often sweeter and more delicate in texture than hard-shelled lobsters, with shells that can be ripped easily by hand. Hard-shelled lobsters, while requiring more labor to shuck, can have a firmer, meatier texture, with a more minerally, briny taste profile.


Recipes

I've always been intrigued by Oysters Rockefeller, described by the great Simon Hopkinson as "the best hot oyster dish I know". Here's his recipe.

"Why oysters Rockefeller is quite so good lies in the perfectly chosen ingredients which marry so well with the unique taste of an oyster" Hopkinson writes. "The transformation from the natural, raw oyster (delicious in itself, of course) to the warmed oyster (never too hot) is critical. Buttery creamed spinach, tarragon, parsley, the essential pastis (Pernod, here) and softened shallot and celery. The aniseed flavours have always been key pastis added to creamed spinach, for instance, absolutely makes that particular dish sing out loud."

250g young spinach leaves

100g unsalted butter, softened

1 large stick of celery, peeled and chopped

the leaves from 3&ndash4 sprigs of tarragon

several shakes of Tabasco sauce

a handful of fresh breadcrumbs

Fill a pan with water and bring to the boil. Plunge in the spinach and parsley, bring back to the boil then drain in a colander. Immediately refresh in iced water until cold. Squeeze as dry as possible between two hands until no more liquid seeps out. Set aside.

Melt 25g of the butter in a small frying pan, gently fry the celery and shallot until softened then add the Pernod, allowing it to bubble a little. Cool briefly, then scrape into the bowl of a small food processor. Add the cooked spinach and parsley, tarragon, Tabasco, salt and the remaining 75g of butter. Purée until very smooth and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 220°C/gas mark 7.

Tip off any excess juice from the opened oysters and, using a small palette knife, completely cover each oyster with a generous coating of the spinach purée. Strew a baking dish (or deep metal pan) with coarse salt, to allow the oysters to sit neatly. Distribute a fine showering of breadcrumbs over the oysters and bake in the oven on the top shelf. Cook for 8&ndash10 minutes or until the breadcrumbs have become slightly toasted. Serve without delay.

What to drink: Not the easiest dish to match with wine. I asked Simon for his view and his suggested a white Rhone ("Fonsalette would be very special, if one can afford it." My own choice, I think, would be a brut nature style of champagne - i.e. one with no or a very low dosage or a premier cru Chablis though I'm sure a Sancerre, Pouilly Fumé or other minerally style of Sauvignon Blanc would be fine."

This recipe comes from Simon Hopkinson Cooks which is published by Ebury Press at £25. Photograph © Jason Lowe.

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How Do You Pair Oysters & Wine?

Oysters are really one of nature’s most magical delicacies. They’re delicious, low in calories, and high in vitamins. Yes, the slimy texture and idea of eating something raw might be daunting to some of us, but there’s no reason you should be intimidated by these little mollusks, because they come in so many flavors and textures it’s hard not to find one you like. Do you prefer something briny, tough, and to the point? Then Long Island Bluepoints are for you. If you want something creamier and sweeter, Olympias are a safe bet. In fact, even seafood haters are in the clear since not all oysters are fishy. There’s truly an oyster for every palate.

Another great thing about oysters is that along with wine, they’re often served as happy hour specials. Now that the sun is setting later and your boss is getting lenient about letting you slip out of the office early on Friday, try and catch a dollar oyster and wine special somewhere near you. Which wine, much like which oyster you should order, depends on your taste.

If you’ve never had oysters before, it can be hard to determine what might be a good fit for you, but roughly speaking, East Coast oysters tend to be salty and chewy, while West Coast oysters have a more creamy, sweet taste. If you’re a major seafood junky and like the smell of the sea, East Coast oysters will suit you. If the idea of slurping an oyster scares you, West Coast oysters might be a better place to start. They’re usually smaller and richer than their East Coast counterparts

36 Gifts and Gadgets For Anyone Who Loves Drinks

Because of their briny toughness, East Coast oysters, like Bluepoints, Malpeques, and Duxbury go well with light-bodied wines with a bit of acidity, such Riesling, Prosecco, and Vinho Verde. If you’re more in the mood for West Coast oysters, like Olympias, Kumamotos, or Kusshis, try slightly heavier white wines such as unoaked Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Cabernet Sauvignon rosé. While your oyster experience will vary with each wine, all of the ones we’ve listed have nice acidity that will cut well through the flesh of the oysters. If you’re not in the mood for any of those wines, no problem – simply try to pair bright, acidic wines with East Coast oysters, and slightly heavier ones with West Coast oysters. We don’t recommend red wines unless they’re particularly light bodied and fruity.

While you’re welcome to eat your oysters and drink your wine however you’d like, we recommend the following: Tip the oyster shell into your mouth and suck out the contents. Then, contrary to popular belief, don’t simply swallow, first chew on the meat and taste the flavor. Now swallow and then take a sip of wine. The brightness of the wine will cleanse your palate and prepare you to try another oyster. Happy slurping!


Mignonette Sauce for Oysters

Have you ever wanted to host a classy dinner for your friends? Oysters on the half shell are the perfect way to go! They seem super fancy, but they&rsquore actually very easy to prepare.

Don&rsquot just go with plain oysters, though. My Mignonette Sauce for Oysters will take your dinner party to the next level! It&rsquos a classic accompaniment to raw oysters, and it only has four ingredients. It&rsquos the perfect blend of oh-so-fancy and criminally easy.

This Mignonette Sauce for Oysters is red-wine-vinegar based sauce that is heavy on the shallots. There are only four ingredients here: vinegar, salt, pepper, and shallots. It&rsquos simple, delicious, and brings out the natural, fresh flavor of your raw oysters. This is definitely a classic you&rsquoll want to bring back again and again.

What is Mignonette Sauce?

The word &ldquomignonette&rdquo used to refer to the small bag of spices used to flavor broths and liquids, but its meaning has changed over time. Now, it&rsquos a sauce served with raw oysters, based on vinegar and black pepper. Don&rsquot confuse it with oyster sauce, by the way! That&rsquos a sauce made out of oysters, definitely not what we want to serve with raw oysters.

Mignonette Sauce is a little spicy, a little peppery, and a little on the sour side. It&rsquos made to balance the briny, salty flavor of fresh oysters.

How To Buy Oysters

When you&rsquore looking for oysters, there are a few basic things to look for. .You want live oysters that have been recently harvested and kept cool and wet. Try to shop at reputable seafood seller or fishmonger&ndashthat&rsquos the easiest way to ensure quality. All oysters should be labeled with harvest tags that tell you when and where they were harvested. If they don&rsquot have them, go elsewhere.

Here are a couple more things to keep in mind while you shop:

  • Oysters should smell fresh and briny, not fishy or rotten
  • Shells should be tightly closed, or snap shut when gently tapped
  • They should feel heavy for their size
  • Shells should be unbroken and undamaged

Storing Raw Oysters

When you&rsquove brought your oysters home, put them in the fridge right away. Double check for any open (dead) oysters and throw them out. It&rsquos important to keep oysters cool and damp when they&rsquore being stored.

A good way to do that is to put them in a bowl covered with a wet towel in the fridge. Don&rsquot put them on ice, because you don&rsquot want them to freeze. A frozen oyster will die and go bad.

How to Shuck Oysters

Before you shuck your oysters, scrub the grit off the outside of the shells with a stiff brush.

To open your oysters, use an oyster knife. They&rsquore heavy enough that they won&rsquot break or snap!

Wear a heavy glove so you don&rsquot accidentally cut yourself and hold the oyster in one hand with the back hinge facing you. Slip the knife into the hinge and twist it until you feel the hinge pop open. Run the blade along the inside of the flat side of the shell to separate to oyster meat from the shell.

What to Serve With Oyster Shooters

Serve your oysters in one side of the oyster shell over ice to keep them very cold. You can find lots of different trays to serve them on. One I like is shaped like a stylized shell! Serve your mignonette sauce next to the oyster tray in a small dish.

There are a few different things you can serve along with your classic Mignonette Sauce. Having a few options can be fun for your guests. They can mix and match and experiment to see what they like best!

  • Cocktail sauce
  • Bread with butter
  • Eggplant
  • Horseradish
  • Cheese

You might also want to include a few drink options. You can totally serve up your oysters with your favorite beer, but if you like wine here are some ideas.

Can&rsquot get enough seafood?

Try my Traeger Clams for something a little more backyard casual, or my Coconut Shrimp for the best seafood breading you&rsquoll ever make. Or check out one of my other favorites!


Gulf Coast Mariner Magazine

A ppetizers are multifold fun. They get the party started by whetting your appetite and teasing your tastebuds. And they can also be served as a meal in tandem with another small plate of food or two. Another idea is to plan a small gathering and have everyone bring their favorite hors d’oeuvres with a paired wine. For the following oyster recipes we suggest pairing with bubbles, from Champagne to sparkling rosé. And any crisp white wine such as Chablis or Sancerre will also pair nicely. Enjoy.

Crispy Oven-Baked Oysters

  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese
  • 2 Tablespoons dried parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 pint shucked oysters

Use three shallow bowls. In the first bowl combine flour, salt, pepper and cayenne. In another bowl whisk eggs. In the third bowl combine bread crumbs, cheese, parsley and garlic salt.

Coat oysters with flour mixture, then dip in eggs, and coat with crumb mixture. Place in greased 15 x 10 x 1 inch baking pan drizzle with oil.

Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes until golden brown. Serve with jalapeño ranch dressing for dipping.

Savory Bacon Wrapped Oysters

  • 12 ounces bacon strips cut in half
  • 1 pint shucked oysters
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar (or white)
  • 1/3 cup tamari or soy sauce
  • 2-3 cloves minced garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard

Cook bacon in skillet style pan on medium-high heat until shrunken, but not crisp. Lay on paper towels to drain. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F.

In a shallow baking dish, whisk together the brown sugar, soy sauce, garlic and dry mustard. Wrap each oyster with bacon and secure with a toothpick. Place in the baking dish with sauce and bake for 15 minutes or longer. Oysters are done when the sauce bubbles and the bacon is crispy around the edges.

Wine Pairings

The Chablis region is the northernmost wine district of the Burgundy region in France. The cool climate of this region produces wines with more acidity and flavors less fruity than Chardonnay. These wines often have a flinty or steely note.

Sancerre Blanc

Sancerre is located in the eastern part of the Loire valley, southeast of Orléans in France. Sancerre blanc is usually bone dry and highly aromatic with intense flavors of peaches and gooseberries.

Tony Chachere’s Easy Gumbo

  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 ribs celery, chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 10 cups cool water
  • 1 cup Tony Chachere’s Instant Roux Mix
  • 1 lb. shrimp and 1 lb. crab meat
  • Tony Chachere Original Creole Seasoning

In a stockpot coated in pan spray, sauté vegetables until soft. In the same pot, add Tony’s Roux, 2 cups of water, 1 cup Tony Chachere’s Instant Roux Mix

Bring to a boil. After mixture begins to thicken, reduce heat to low and stir for 3 minutes. Add remaining water. For seafood gumbo, bring roux mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Add shrimp and crab meat and return to a simmer for 15 minutes.

Add remaining water. Season gumbo to taste with Tony Chachere’s Original Creole Seasoning. Ladle gumbo over steamed rice and garnish with chopped green onions and Tony Chachere’s Gumbo Filé.

/>Opelousas Oyster Loaf

  • 1 Loaf French Bread, unsliced
  • Margarine
  • 1 Dozen select large oysters
  • 1 Egg
  • Ketchup
  • Tony Chachere’s Original Creole Seasoning
  • 1/2 Cup light cream
  • 1 Cup bread crumbs
  • 1 Cup oil
  • Dill pickles (sliced)
  • Lemon (wedges)

Cut off top of the French Bread lengthwise and reserve. Scoop out insides and toast the loaf. Butter inside generously and keep warm. Dry oysters on absorbent paper.

In a bowl, beat egg with Tony Chachere’s Original Creole Seasoning, slowly adding cream. Place oysters in egg mixture, then in bread crumbs, thoroughly covering all sides. Fry in shallow oil until brown and drain on absorbent paper.

Fill the hollow of French Bread with the fried oysters. Garnish with sliced dill pickles, lemon wedges and dabs of ketchup. Replace top, heat in oven and serve. Yields 4 servings.


About Matthieu Longuère MS

Matthieu Longuere is a Master Sommelier based at Le Cordon Bleu London, a leading culinary arts, wine and management school.

Sommelier in the UK since 1994, he has won numerous awards and accolades for wine lists in the establishments for which he has worked: Lucknam Park Country House Hotel, Hotel du Vin Bristol and La Trompette.

Since joining Le Cordon Bleu in 2013, he has developed the school’s comprehensive Diploma in Wine, Gastronomy and Management a unique programme which combines the theory of wine with a strong emphasis on practical learning.

Alongside the full Diploma, he also teaches an array of evening classes which are relaxed, yet studious, making them perfect for beginners as well as the more knowledgeable.



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