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Tribal Farmers Market Goes On The Road

Tribal Farmers Market Goes On The Road


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September 14, 2014

By

Food Tank

The Mobile Farmers Market aims to strengthen regional Native American food economy and promote environmentally conscious tribal economic development. They are currently embarking on a Tribal Trade Routes Roadtrip that will help tribal producers share traditional foods and their stories with tribal and non-tribal consumers nationwide.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


Tribal ryots script a success story

Cooperative farming coupled with prudent marketing strategy has enabled a group of tribal farmers of this tiny village to effectively deal with the agrarian crisis plaguing several parts in Yellendu mandal.

As many as 18 tribal farmers of this village have formed a self-help group christened “Sri Vinayaka Vegetable Growers Association” last year and reaped rich harvest by growing vegetables.

A vending van sanctioned by the Horticulture Department came in handy for the members of the group to steer their vegetable farming venture on the path of progress.

The senior members of the group devised a plan of action entrusting separate tasks ranging from accessing help from the government agencies, conducting field and market study, albeit informally.

Their collective efforts received a fillip when the Horticulture Department sanctioned a vending van on 50 per cent subsidy last year.

Cashing in on the support of the department, the members of the group cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd in around 15 acres initially.

They earned good dividends by selling their vegetable produce in Rythu Bazaars in Khammam and other big towns at a remunerative price.

“We have cultivated ridge gourd and bitter gourd, which are most sought after among the consumers due to their health benefits,” said Jarpula Linga, the leader of the group.

“The vending van helped us in cutting down the cost of transportation and eliminating the menace of middlemen. We carry around 20 quintals of vegetables produced by our group members in the van at a time saving fuel costs,” Mr. Linga said.

“Cooperative endeavour, drip irrigation, market-oriented approach helped us cope with the difficult times caused by the extended dry spell that claimed the life of a farmer in our neighbouring Komararam village,” said Bhanuchander, another member of the group.

The department has sanctioned a vending van to the self-help group of farmers of Amarsingh Thanda on 50 per cent subsidy last year under the Quality Management Programme, an initiative of the Centre-sponsored Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, says Marianna, Horticulture Officer, Khammam.


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