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Just Released: 4 Sonoma Whites

Just Released: 4 Sonoma Whites


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Sonoma County is rapidly becoming our go-to bin for high-quality white wines in California. Not that the reds are bad — the area grows both excellent cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir — but many of our best whites made from sauvignon blanc, pinot blanc and gris, chardonnay, and other varieties are grown in one of the sub-regions of Sonoma.

These four just released whites are good examples:

The 2010 Quivera "Refuge" Dry Creek sauvignon blanc ($28) has lovely fruit flavors of green, juicy gooseberries, and apples with just a touch of butter at the finish. It has an excellent balance between fruit and acid — perfect to go with the spicy tartness of choucroute (sauerkraut) garni.

Another sauvignon blanc, this one, the 2011 Sbragia Dry Creek ($19) is slightly different, with a lovely spiciness and a fuller body, yet the wine isn’t "fat" on the palate. It is a touch sweet, but it has intense flavors that finish long with many notes of citrus. It would go well with a baked fish with a cream or butter sauce.

The 2011 J California Pinot Gris ($16) has a little oiliness that we normally get from riesling, some white pepper, and a little gewürztraminer-style spritz. It has a moderate body with a nice, crisp finish. Quite good — perfect to sip with a shrimp salad.

Finally, a wine from a grape that is lesser known and lesser grown in Sonoma — viognier. The 2011 Hawley Sonoma County viognier ($25) is on the sweet and full side of the variety, but it is still quite interesting and very Rhone-like in its approach. It has a characteristic, lovely orange and tropical fruit base that goes with a floral, white-flowers finish. It would be lovely with a juicy, young chicken that has been baked or broiled.

The fact that Sonoma can make great white wines isn’t new. But the fact that it is becoming very diverse in its offerings makes us want to keep our eyes — and lips — on it.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


Danish Aebleskiver Recipe

I have been telling my kids for years about my mom making Aebleskiver (Danish round pancakes) as well as the other Danish pancakes when I was growing up. I remember visiting my grandmother (mormor) in Denmark as a kid and having Aebelskiver in Tivoli Gardens.

So when I opened one of my Christmas gifts this year and found an Aebleskiver pan, I instantly went back to my childhood and couldn’t wait to have my kids experience these delightful round pancakes filled with jam and fresh fruit.

My wife whipped up the following recipe that came with the pan and they were delicious. The recipe is for making 40 round pancakes and we decided to cut the recipe in half but what a mistake. They went so fast we regretted not making the whole batch.

The Aebleskiver Pan

The pan from Williams Sonoma is made of heavy cast-aluminum, has a stay cool cast stainless steel handle and seven deep wells for the pancake batter. The Nordic Ware company started making Aebleskiver Pans back in 1950.

This family owned business from Minnesota joined up with Williams-Sonoma to make this updated version with a nonstick coating to help release the pancakes from the pan.

I read on the Solvang Restaurant web site (see below) a little history of the pan. They say the Aebleskiver pan comes from the Viking days when after a long day of battle, the warriors were hungry and would go back to their viking ships and make a type of pancake using their shields in lieu of pans.

I’m guessing the design of the shields included wells for the batter. This may just be a good story but I like it.

Danish Pancakes In Solvang, CA

I just happen to be in Solvang, California, a small Central Coast community in the San Ynez Valley that was originally founded by a group of Danish educators back in 1911.

The town’s architecture has been modeled in a Danish style and you can find restaurants, bakeries and stores selling Scandinavian goods although I was told by one local that there aren’t many Danes left in town.

One morning we enjoyed breakfast at the Solvang Restaurant – home of Arne’s famous “Aebleskiver” on Copenhagen Drive. The restaurant was bright and decorated for Christmas and the servers were friendly.

We could tell the locals were in there early like we were because when the tourists arrived in town around 10 am, you couldn’t get near the place.

We all ordered three of Arne’s Aebleskiver served with raspberry jam and powdered sugar. I was thinking they wouldn’t be enough after watching my kids devour 20 Aebleskiver at home on Christmas morning but these were much bigger and in my opinion a little too “doughy”.

My wife’s Aebleskiver following the recipe below were much better. They were moister and had a richer flavor perhaps because of the fillings but maybe from the higher egg to flour ratio.

If there are any Danes out there reading this blog, please post your recipe for homemade Aebleskiver in the comments below.


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