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  1. Home
  2. Entertain
  3. Setting the Scene

July 11, 2012

Aargh-Shmallows!

Bad Cheese

English Breakfast

Belated

Doing Donuts

Mail Order Bride

McDonald's as Sculpture

Missing Oreo

Paper Training Our Little Dog, Frank

A Pair of Lovers

Peanut Mourning

Persius Potato


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Make Food for Struggling Monarch Butterflies Using Your Leftovers

Pity the monarch butterflies. Not only do the earnest flutterers fly up to 265 miles a day on their trek between northern and southern climes, but they must do so in the face of a number of challenges.

Some years bring strong winds and unusual weather, which can throw off the timing of the migration. Scientists and butterfly observers alike stay on the watch for “ecological mismatch.” Concerns include whether or not milkweed host-plants will be ready for their lepidopteran guests. Will there be a surprise cold snap? Will the unusual weather affect breeding success?

The butterflies are at a critical point. Population estimates rise and fall, but deforestation of the overwintering habitat in Mexico continues to threaten the species.

In the north (U.S. and Canada), the butterflies face habitat destruction thanks to new roads, housing developments, and agricultural expansion. They are also up against more subtle forms of habitat destruction in the loss of milkweed, which larvae feed on exclusively.

Considered a pesky nuisance by many, it is often weeded into oblivion. Both milkweed and nectar plants are vulnerable to the herbicides used by landscapers, farmers, and gardeners, and others -- not to mention the lethal impact insecticides have on the butterflies.

Re-establishing milkweed is crucial. “Monarch butterfly populations are declining due to loss of habitat. To assure a future for monarchs, conservation and restoration of milkweeds needs to become a national priority,” said Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch

So if you have an extra patch of dirt, perhaps consider planting some milkweed. In the meantime, you can also help the flitting lovelies by using leftovers to making butterfly food.


Watch the video: Bent Objects: Hilarious Food Art (October 2022).