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Best of New Orleans #7

Best of New Orleans #7


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Every day during the month of August, we’re highlighting one restaurant from our recent ranking of the 31 Best Restaurants in New Orleans. Today’s restaurant, Herbsaint, is #7 on our list.

Chef Donald Link is the latest in a long line of world-class chefs to hone his chops in New Orleans, incorporating the city’s flavors and vitality into his cooking. Link is also the man behind the now-legendary Cochon. Herbsaint is his more upscale (yet still fun and accessible) modern bistro; French and Italian-inspired yet still classically Southern. Standout dishes include butter-poached Gulf tuna with pickled chilies and mint, jumbo shrimp with tasso-stewed collard greens and grits, and slow-cooked lamb neck with saffron fideo and tomato confit.

Related

Here's our complete ranking:
#31. Maurepas Fine Foods
#30. Boucherie
#29. Mother’s
#28. Luke
#27. The Joint
#26. Dickie Brennan's Steakhouse
#25. Mahony’s
#24. MiLa
#23. La Petite Grocery
#22. Gautreau’s
#21. Coquette
#20. Parkway Bakery
#19. Clancy’s
#18. Dooky Chase
#17. Drago’s
#16. Emeril’s
#15. Redfish Grill
#14. Jacques-Imo’s
#13. Bayona
#12. Camellia Grill
#11. Domilese’s
#10. Willie Mae’s Scotch House
#9. SoBou
#8. Root
#7. Herbsaint
#6. Domenica
#5. Cochon
#4. Peche
#3. August
#2. Galatoire’s
#1. Commander’s Palace


Best of New Orleans #7 - Recipes

Make the roux by gradually adding the flour to the oil in the pot, stirring constantly. Cook over low heat until a dark brown roux (the color of peanut butter) is formed. Do not try to hurry this step. The roux is the most important part of any gumbo base, and will take approximately 20-30 minutes of stirring to get it right. It's worth the wait.

When the roux reaches the right color, quickly add the sausage, onion, green pepper, scallion tops, ham, parsley and garlic. Continue cooking over low heat for 10 minutes more, still stirring, then add 1/4 cup of the water, the reserved chicken pieces and all the seasonings except the file powder mix thoroughly. Gradually stir in the rest of the water. Raise the heat and bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer the gumbo for 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until the chicken parts are tender. Stir frequently, taking care not to break the pieces of chicken.

Before serving, bring the gumbo back to a boil and add the shrimp and fish. Simmer just until the shrimp turn pink, about 10-12 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and let the simmer die down. Add the file powder and stir. Let the gumbo stand in the pot for 5 minutes after adding the file, then serve in gumbo bowls or deep soup bowls over boiled rice.

If this recipe makes too much for your family to eat at one time, take only the amount you want to serve and add the file to it. The leftovers, or "lagniappe" (another marvelous meal), should be stored in the refrigerator, and the file added after reheating.


7 Restaurants On The Outskirts Of New Orleans That Are Worthy Of A Pilgrimage

With so many incredible restaurants in New Orleans, one might wonder why anyone would ever leave the city to go eat. Well, we’ve got seven reasons, and each one is worthy of a pilgrimage. None of these restaurants are more than a 30-minute drive, so why not gather up the family and set off to enjoy a delicious meal at one of these fabulous restaurants near New Orleans?

You’ll find Bear’s over in the heart of Covington. This no-frills restaurant may not look like much from the outside, but they’ve got some of the best po’boys on the northshore. You’ll probably encounter a long line when you walk in, but we promise you it’s worth the wait.

Address: 128 West 21st Avenue, Covington, LA, 70433

This counter-service restaurant is a locally owned and operated hidden gem with two locations in both Covington and Mandeville. From hearty salads to delicious pasta dishes and specialty dishes, this is one restaurant that’s certainly worthy of a pilgrimage from New Orleans.

Mandeville Address:3517 US-190 Mandeville, LA, 70471
Covington Address: 234 Lee Lane, Covington, LA, 70433

Crabby Jack's is a spin-off of the Oak Street eatery, Jacques-Imo's. The menu is filled with incredible po'boys and New Orleans favorites that you're sure to love.

Address: 428 Jefferson Highway, New Orleans, LA, 70118

Diner food is great, and Dot’s Diner has some of the best in the New Orleans area. With a breakfast menu served all day and multiple locations near New Orleans, you can always count on some old-fashioned, made to order diner dishes from Dot’s.

Metairie Address: 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, LA, 70003
Jefferson Address: 2317 Jefferson Highway, New Orleans, LA, 70121
Kenner Address: 2239 Williams Boulevard, Kenner, LA, 70062
River Ridge Address: 10701 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge, LA, 70123
Luling Address: 12179 Highway 90, Luling, LA, 70070

Established in 1972, Giorlando’s is a family-run and operated Italian restaurant that every New Orleanian needs to visit. The menu is full of family recipes made from scratch every day and you can taste the difference.

Address: 741 Bonnabel Boulevard, Metairie, LA, 70005

When you’re in the mood for Creole cuisine, head on over to Kenner Seafood where you’ll find all sorts of tasty dishes. Feast on mouthwatering Creole specialities like jambalaya, seafood gumbo, jalapeño hush puppies plus an endless array of fried and grilled seafood platters.

Address: 3140 Loyola Drive, Kenner, LA, 70065

R&O’s Restaurant has been a neighborhood favorite since they opened in 1981. Known for their pizza and po’boys, you can’t go wrong with anything on the menu at this family-friendly restaurant.

Address: 216 Metairie Hammond Highway, Metairie, LA, 70005

Have you eaten at any of these restaurants? Where’s your favorite place to grab a bite that’s on the outskirts of the city? Let us know in the comments below!


New Orleans food writers find, compile city's recipes

Nobody in this part of the world has to be reminded of the horrors wrought by Hurricane Katrina.

It was a horrendous time that many of us would just as soon forget.

But in the wake of that terrible storm comes at least one good thing, a terrific new cookbook that captures the essence, flavor and the spirit of the folks who endured the worst of the storm.
"Cooking Up a Storm: Recipes Lost and Found from The Times Picayune of New Orleans" is a collection of heirloom and family recipes from New Orleans that is a must for anybody who loves to cook and eat.

The authors of the 400-page book are legendary New Orleans food authorities Marcel Bienvenu and Judy Walker. Bienvenu writes the popular "Cooking Creole" column in the Picayune, and Walker is the food editor for that publication. Together they have written several cookbooks.

But this book is different. It became as much a part of the post-Katrina healing process as any government subsidy or promise. It brought hope to displaced New Orleanians who feared their family recipes would be forever lost to the storm.

The idea for the book sprang (like so many good ideas) from the readers of the Times Picayune.

"One lady wrote a letter to me suggesting that we use the paper's recipe swap column to help round up lost recipes," Walker said during a recent trip to the area for a book-signing.

Over fried oyster salad and crab soup at Felix's Oyster House on the Causeway recently, she and Bienvenu outlined how the book mushroomed from there.

"I sent a memo to the publisher, and the big ball just got rolling from there," Walker said.

Since eating and cooking are such an essential part of New Orleans, it was a natural.

On Oct. 7, 2005, Walker invited her readers to take part in a program they called "Rebuilding New Orleans, Recipe by Recipe." Essentially, the idea was to pair readers who needed a particular recipe with folks who still had theirs.

They weren't sure what the response would be, if there would be one at all. They did it hoping for the best.


#3 For A Hangover Cure: Cochon Butcher

Another of NOLA&rsquos iconic eats is the humble muffaleta a dense bread roll filled with provolone, mortadella, salami, ham and olive salad. It was invented by an Italian immigrant and is now considered as important a sandwich in these parts as the Po Boy.

Plenty of locals will tell you that the best one comes from &ldquoThe Butcher&rdquo, the laid-back sister venue to next door&rsquos date-night worthy Cochon. It&rsquos a wine bar, sandwich counter and butcher shop, and though the menu is home to many decadent lunch options, the muffaletta is the one that&rsquoll revive a sore head.

Where: 930 Tchoupitoulas Street, New Orleans


New Orleans Itinerary: Day Two

I hope you had a blast yesterday because today is going to be &hellip sobering. New Orleans is a lot of fun and throws a GREAT party, but it&rsquos important to look back at the complex and dark history of New Orleans to understand how it became the vibrant and diverse place it is today.

Today, you&rsquoll be visiting plantations. Not because they&rsquore pretty &ndash they&rsquore too evil to be pretty.

But because plantations represent a huge, defining piece of New Orleans history. And because we owe that respect to the hundreds of thousands of people who were kidnapped and brought here from West Africa, enslaved, chained, beaten, and killed &ndash and yet still managed to shape the culture of New Orleans.

Prepare yourself: today is going to be gut-wrenching. But I promise that after today, you&rsquoll see New Orleans in a different &ndash and deeper, and more complex &ndash light.

Coffee & Breakfast

Eat a quick, early breakfast at the Silver Whistle Cafe, which is located in the Pontchartrain Hotel. It&rsquos a famous historic cafe known for being the hotspot where the city&rsquos big wigs, like Frank Sinatra and Truman Capote, hung out to make deals and gossip.

Today, you can sit at the 10-top where they sat while drinking a cup of coffee and enjoying the cafe&rsquos famous blueberry muffins.

If we&rsquore being totally honest, chances are you won&rsquot be hungry for lunch: plantations have a tendency to replace any hunger you might feel with a pit of sorrow in your stomach.

So fill up on breakfast, and we promise the wait will be worth it for dinner.

Whitney Plantation is the only plantation museum in Louisiana with an exclusive focus on the lives of enslaved people. The site functions as a memorial to the lives lost during slavery, with a brutally honest look at the harsh realities of the Louisiana sugar plantations.

Tour the Whitney Plantation

Although the New Orleans of today is a thriving and bustling city &ndash despite being gutted by Hurricane Katrina just a decade ago &ndash the history of the city is much darker. New Orleans &ndash and the entirety of Louisiana &ndash was built by enslaved people.

The wealth you see in the mansions of the Garden District or the elaborate facades of the French Quarter was paid for with money earned by kidnapping human beings from West Africa, enslaving them, and exploiting their labor.

It is an ugly history. And we feel that it&rsquos not right to enjoy the beauty of New Orleans, to eat delicious Creole food and dance to jazz music, without acknowledging where that food and that music &ndash and much of New Orleans&rsquo flavor, soul, and spirit &ndash came from.

We chose to visit a plantation to pay homage to the enslaved people who built and shaped this beautiful city.

There are 3 main plantations within an hour&rsquos drive of New Orleans: Whitney Plantation, Oak Alley, and Laura Plantation. We cannot emphasize enough that the Whitney Plantation is the best choice for a plantation tour in New Orleans.

The Whitney Plantation is the only plantation in Louisiana that focuses exclusively on the lives of enslaved people. It honestly and academically portrays the history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its effect on Louisiana while respectfully memorializing the thousands of lives that were lost.

During your tour, you&rsquoll &ldquomeet&rdquo the enslaved children who once lived here, represented by beautiful and haunting statues throughout the property. The Children of the Whitney have names, and they tell their stories in their own words via recordings that were made in the early 19th century.

The Whitney Plantation features plaques and statues commemorating those quotes, as well as names and other known details about the thousands of enslaved people whose stories were once lost to history.

This tour is powerful, impactful, and emotional, and you should fully prepare yourself to cry. Allow yourself feel that sadness, and let it fuel your drive to prevent the injustices of racism and greed that led to the cruelty and inhumanity of slavery.

  • Travel Tip: Whitney Plantation is located about 45 minutes outside of New Orleans. We rented a car from Enterprise in the Garden District so we could explore multiple plantations at our own leisure, but we recommend booking a tour to the Whitney Plantation &ndash it covers both your transportation and entry fee.

Tour the Laura Plantation (Optional)

If you&rsquove got extra time and want to visit a second plantation, you can take a tour of the Laura Plantation.

The Laura Plantation was a Creole plantation, meaning that the owners were originally from France (and not Anglo-Saxon). It was also a women-run plantation, which was very rare at the time in the United States.

Memoirs from a plantation owner named Laura Locoul, which detailed what life was like in Antebellum Creole Louisiana for a wealthy white woman, were found in the plantation &ndash hence its name.

The plantation was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 because its buildings and associated quarters, including the slave quarters, are still intact.

We didn&rsquot have a chance to take a guided tour ourselves, but we&rsquove heard that it does cover the lives of the enslaved who lived there.

That said, it&rsquos not as progressive or brutally honest as the Whitney Plantation.

Oak Alley is menacingly pretty. But we don&rsquot consider &ldquopretty&rdquo a reason to visit a plantation.

&hellip What About that Other Plantation?

You may notice that we&rsquove chosen to exclude the most popular New Orleans plantation, Oak Alley. This was intentional.

We did visit Oak Alley, and we felt that the lives of the enslaved were not portrayed accurately nor given enough focus.

The takeaway of the tour was not that slavery was a horrible chapter of history, but that the plantation was pretty.

One look at the guestbook told us everything we needed to know: page after page of comments that all said the same thing: &ldquoso beautiful. So pretty. Such wonderful trees.&rdquo

Yes, Oak Alley is very pretty, in a menacing way &ndash but that&rsquos not a good reason to visit a plantation.

Plantations are the USA&rsquos equivalent of concentration camps or killing fields. Thousands of people were imprisoned and murdered here. Families were torn apart. Unspeakable cruelty was a daily necessity in order to maintain a status quo fed by greed and money.

And to downplay that harsh reality in favor of emphasizing the

romance of the antebellum era is, we feel, infuriatingly dishonest and disrespectful.

Romanticizing the lives of the enslavers, with their lavish furnishings and luxurious homes, does a disservice to the lives lost during slavery, and perpetuates a myth about the antebellum area that we feel is dangerous and racist.

To be fair, Oak Alley has gotten a little bit better in recent years (since the Whitney Plantation opened its doors). They used to dress their employees in Antebellum clothing, which is a bit like visiting a Concentration Camp and going on a tour led by a uniformed Nazi.

They don&rsquot do that anymore. So &hellip that&rsquos good.

We hope that the progressive trend continues, because we&rsquod love to visit a &ldquobeautiful&rdquo plantation that&rsquos brutally honest about the cost of such beauty. But until then, we can&rsquot recommend visiting Oak Alley. The photo just isn&rsquot worth it.

Dinner at Gris-Gris

After a long and emotional day, Creole comfort food is just what you need. Gris-Gris, located in the Garden District, serves traditional New Orleans food with an elevated twist.

The owner worked at the famed Commander&rsquos Palace for several years before opening Gris-Gris in 2018. The restaurant quickly became the most exciting and popular place to eat in town &ndash which is why you&rsquoll either want to make a reservation in advance or plan to wait for a seat at the bar upstairs. We awkwardly hovered at the bar for about 15 minutes before two seats opened up.

Unlike most of the historic and traditional restaurants in New Orleans, Gris-Gris features a modern open kitchen layout where you can see the chefs preparing your food. We&rsquore the kind of people who watch Chopped while we eat, so we enjoy a good cooking show with our meal!

Of course, if you sit at the bar upstairs, you&rsquoll have to settle for watching your bartender instead, but you&rsquoll get a chance to walk through the kitchen if you visit the bathroom.

  • Travel Tip: Order the oyster BLT, the gumbo, and the shrimp & fried green tomatoes &ndash they were all heavenly. Honestly, everything we ordered was insanely good, so you can&rsquot go wrong.

Drinks at Hot Tin

Featuring breathtaking views of New Orleans&rsquo Garden District, Downtown, and the Mississippi River, Hot Tin is a chic bar on the roof of the Pontchartrain Hotel.

The bar was designed to model the home of Tennessee Williams, a famed New Orleans playwright who was said to be living in the Pontchartrain Hotel while he wrote his classic, A Streetcar Named Desire.

If you time things just right, this is the perfect place to watch the sun setting over the New Orleans skyline, cocktail in hand.

The French Market in New Orleans, Louisiana was once a thriving Native American trading post. And then some Europeans showed up, appropriated everything, and took over. Oh, USA history, you are terrible. Anyway, the French Market today is a rad place to visit!


New Orleans French Bread

17 Comments:

My uncle use to have bakery in larose(not sure if i spelled it right) and i have been begging my mom to try and find it and if i do i will share

I have a Po-Boy Shop in Morehead, KY. The only option I found was to order the bread directly from Gambino's. Sysco has a food code if they would be willing to bring it in. http://gambinos.info/

goto food service tab and check out bread

Hi, my name is Tom and I have retired from Louisiana to Florida. Here is the best recipe for French bread that I have ever found. It is from a 1972 cookbook by Tony Chachere who later became famous for his Cajun seasoning. Tony is from Opelousas.

HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD
2 1/2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons salt
1 package dry yeast or 7 cups flour
1 yeast cake 2 egg whites, well
2 tablespoons sugar beaten
In large bowl combine yeast, warm water, sugar and salt: stir until dissolved. Gradually add sifted flour and mix until well blended. Knead 10 minutes on well-floured surface un­til dough is smooth and satiny. Let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk. Punch down and place on floured surface. Knead 3 or 4 times to remove air and divide into 4 equal pieces.
Shape into loaves, place in well-greased pans. Slash tops and brush with egg whites. Let rise until double in bulk and bake 15 minutes in pre-heated 450-degree oven or 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Remove from pans and cool. (Makes 4 loaves)
NOTE: Wrap extra loaves in aluminum foil and freeze. To re­serve, warm in foil 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

It's the water in SE La. It's different. Grew up there and realized that REAL Po-Boy bread will never be made anywhere else.

In the St. Louis area, a grocery store called Dierberg's has bread that to my palate is indistinguishable from Leidenheimer's.

Tom's bread recipe, unfortunately, is not the answer. I made bread with that exact recipe today. It produces a very nice loaf with a chewy crust and fine crumb texture, nothing at all like the hard crusty NO French bread with the open "custard" texture. I don't think any recipe that calls for a lot of kneading is likely to produce the right interior texture. Read NO French bread can't be that hard to make, but why can't we find the right recipe?

Have you tried using a salt rising mix?

Tom: Please rewrite your recipe, I'm having a hard time understanding it. Thanks, StrokerMcgurk.

growing up in New Orleans, I believe I was told that the bread is distinct because of the where it is prepared (below sea level) with very high humidity. I'm not physicist, but could this be the problem you are running into when it come to quality? I say this because I know that water boils in varying amounts of time depending on elevation.

HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD
2 1/2 cups warm water
2 teaspoons salt
1 package dry yeast or 1 yeast cake
7 cups flour
2 egg whites,
2 tablespoons sugar

In large bowl combine yeast, warm water, sugar and salt: stir until dissolved.
Gradually add sifted flour and mix until well blended.
Knead 10 minutes on well-floured surface until dough is smooth and satiny.
Let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk.
Punch down and place on floured surface.
Knead 3 or 4 times to remove air and divide into 4 equal pieces.
Shape into loaves, place in well-greased pans.
Slash tops and brush with egg whites.
Let rise until double in bulk and bake 15 minutes in pre-heated 450-degree oven or 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
Remove from pans and cool. (Makes 4 loaves)

NOTE: Wrap extra loaves in aluminum foil and freeze. To reheat: wrap in foil, place in 350 degree oven for 20 minutes.

To Anonymous who said "I have a Po-Boy Shop in . " Wrong! You have a sandwich shop, not a po-boy shop. I live here in Louisiana and I get annoyed at the number of places here that do the same. I have yet to find a real po-boy outside of the greater New Orleans area.

John Gendusa Bakery (not mentioned in this article) is the real thing. Never ever buy po-boy bread if it's not in an open (on one end) paper bag.

To achieve the crust your looking for place a pan of water in the bottom of your oven. It will raise the humidity and give your crust a nice finish.

I worked at the Angelo Gendusa Bakery when I was about 22 during the Winter of 1990. They had a big steam box or steam room where the bread was left to rise on racks. Working there was an amazing experience.

Um what about Reising's French bread? And I think we're going for a flaky crust vs a hard (egg-white-brushed) crust. Here in SE LOUISIANA both WalMart and WinnDixie sell "French bread" with hard crusts but it's not the same as Reising's French bread. When someone finds the RIGHT recipe, it won't say "cut slits" or " brush with egg whites".

To "Anonymous 2:10PM": how rude of you! He/she orders the bread from Gambino's. How much more authenticity do you want? . have you ever eaten a poboy from there?? Like you, I have strong opinions about poboys vs hoagies vs subs. But let's play nice !

Um what about Reising's French bread? And I think we're going for a flaky crust vs a hard (egg-white-brushed) crust. Here in SE LOUISIANA both WalMart and WinnDixie sell "French bread" with hard crusts but it's not the same as Reising's French bread. When someone finds the RIGHT recipe, it won't say "cut slits" or " brush with egg whites".


Ingredients

What actually makes gumbo gumbo is a bit tricky and can be a point of contention among different Louisianans who are sure that their recipe is the right one. All gumbos do have a few things in common, though. For starters, they're always thickened with one or more of the following:

  • Dark roux: a mixture of fat and flour, cooked very slowly on the stovetop
  • Okra: a vegetable which turns slimy and viscous when cooked
  • Filé powder: a spice and thickening agent made from dried sassafras leaves

Filé is typically added to the gumbo after it has been taken off the heat, but roux and okra are added during the cooking process.

Gumbo main ingredients typically include game meats, chicken, sausage, and shellfish, though the combinations thereof vary depending on regional differences, seasonal availability, family preferences, and the whimsy of the chef.

Seasoning vegetables are almost always the Holy Trinity of Cajun cuisine: celery, onions, and green bell peppers, and these are chopped fine and cooked until they are no longer identifiable. Some cooks might add garlic or red bell peppers, and Creole gumbos sometimes include tomatoes.

Seasoning herbs and spices are highly variable, but almost always include salt, cayenne pepper, and black pepper, and may also include white pepper, bay leaves, thyme, parsley, or others.


Events & Tickets

Details for our Wednesday, June 9th Wine Dinners will be announced soon. In the meantime, check out our Wine Dinner Series that we have all year round.

Ella Brennan "Stand Up For Your Hometown" Awards at the Rib Room

Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Tuesday, June 8th, 2021 VIP Reception: 6:00-7:00pm Award Gala: 7:00-10:00pm Honoring: Zach Strief of Port Orleans Brewing Co. Isaac and Amanda Toups of Toups' Meatery Phil Moseley.

SOLD OUT - Ella Brennan "Stand Up For Your Hometown" Awards at Broussard's

Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - Tuesday, June 8, 2021

SOLD OUT: Tuesday, June 8th, 2021 VIP Reception: 6:00-7:00pm Award Gala: 7:00-10:00pm Honoring: Zeid, Marv and Richy Ammari of Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts Al Copeland Jr. of.

Ella Brennan "Stand Up For Your Hometown" Awards at Galerie de Galatoire

Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Tuesday, June 8th, 2021 VIP Reception: 6:00-7:00pm Award Gala: 7:00-10:00pm Honoring: Melvin Rodrigue of The National Restaurant Association Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski of Link Restauant Group.

Vinola Afternoon

Thursday, June 10, 2021 - Thursday, June 10, 2021

LIMITED TICKETS: Wine lovers with an appreciation for the finer things in life will find VINOLA to be the place to connect with fine wines and interact with winemakers. As the wine industry.

Vinola Evening

Thursday, June 10, 2021 - Thursday, June 10, 2021

LIMITED TICKETS: Wine lovers with an appreciation for the finer things in life will find VINOLA to be the place to connect with fine wines and interact with winemakers. As the wine industry.

Friday, June 11, 2021 - Saturday, June 12, 2021

Get schooled by top wine professionals and celebrated chefs through their exciting presentations on what&rsquos hot in the wine industry and culinary world. There is something for.

Experiences

Friday, June 11, 2021 - Saturday, June 12, 2021

Step out for a one-of-a-kind, interactive wine and food encounter that showcases New Orleans&rsquo unique culture and style. These real-life experiences take you on journeys through neighborhoods.

SOLD OUT - Grand Tasting Friday Evening

Friday, June 11, 2021 - Friday, June 11, 2021

SOLD OUT: Grand Tasting Friday Evening at NOWFE showcases wines from around the world and food served by New Orleans Finest Chefs. Wine connoisseurs will take.

SOLD OUT - Tournament of Rosés

Saturday, June 12, 2021 - Saturday, June 12, 2021

SOLD OUT: LIMITED TICKETS: Get your game on and head to Fulton Street for this unique opportunity to see the world through rosé-filled glasses. Taste through premier.

Grand Tasting Saturday Afternoon

Saturday, June 12, 2021 - Saturday, June 12, 2021

LIMITED TICKETS: Grand Tasting Saturday Afternoon at NOWFE showcases wines from around the world and food served by New Orleans Finest Chefs. Wine connoisseurs will take pleasure.

Grand Tasting Saturday Evening

Saturday, June 12, 2021 - Saturday, June 12, 2021

LIMITED TICKETS: Grand Tasting Saturday Evening at NOWFE showcases wines from around the world and food served by New Orleans Finest Chefs. Wine connoisseurs will take pleasure.

SOLD OUT - Burlesque, Bubbly & Brunch

Sunday, June 13, 2021 - Sunday, June 13, 2021

SOLD OUT: Join Trixie Minx and her Burlesque Beauties for a one of a kind NOWFE experience: Burlesque, Bubbly, and Brunch, which features a plated brunch prepared.


Hacking Iconic New Orleans Barbecue Shrimp Far From The Gulf

Barbecue head-on shrimp made at Pascal's Manale. It may be hard to find head-on shrimp in cities away from the coast, so Pascal's Manale co-owner and chef Mark DeFelice came up with a shortcut. awiederhoeft/Flickr hide caption

Barbecue head-on shrimp made at Pascal's Manale. It may be hard to find head-on shrimp in cities away from the coast, so Pascal's Manale co-owner and chef Mark DeFelice came up with a shortcut.

This summer, NPR is getting crafty in the kitchen. As part of Weekend Edition's Do Try This At Home series, chefs are sharing their cleverest hacks and tips — taking expensive, exhausting or intimidating recipes and tweaking them to work in any home kitchen.

This week: A play on an iconic New Orleans dish to get supreme flavor from shrimp without heads.

Mark DeFelice has been cooking in the kitchen of Pascal's Manale restaurant in New Orleans for most of his 59 years. He and his brothers are the fourth generation to run the restaurant, which was opened in 1913 by Frank Manale in a corner grocery store. His nephew, Pascal Radosta, took over the restaurant after Frank died in 1937, and because everybody called it "Manale's," Pascal decided to call it Pascal's Manale as a way to honor his uncle. The restaurant became a fixture in town among politicians, judges, sports figures and a few gangsters.

Pascal's Manale in New Orleans. Joel Carranza/Flickr hide caption


Watch the video: TOP 10 Things to do in NEW ORLEANS. NOLA Travel Guide 4K (September 2022).


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