New recipes

America's Best Firehouse Chefs

America's Best Firehouse Chefs


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The nation's firemen bring some serious heat to the kitchen

Whipping up a tasty, economical meal for a huge group of firemen every night is no small task.

Many of the country’s bravest firemen are also excellent cooks. When they’re not responding to the calls that so often save our lives, they’re at the station pulling shifts and are required to budget, shop for, and make their own meals — usually for groups of 12 or more.

Click here to see the America's Best Firehouse Chefs Slideshow

It’s a big responsibility. In most cases, firefighters each chip in $6 to $12 to cover all of the day’s meals, and the person whose turn it is to cook that day has to run to the supermarket during their downtime, and then go to work and prep.

It’s little wonder then that in most firehouses, there’s at least one person who quickly earns a reputation for knowing not only how to stretch a dollar but how to spice meat for the grill, simmer a wine-based sauce, or heat rice to steamy perfection. Sometimes, these culinary stars grew up in homes where cooking was an art form passed down through the generations, but others developed skills out of the necessity of rotating shifts and the pressure of serving food to an audience all too happy to rib you when your latest dish is, well, less than edible.

We scoured the country to find the top firehouse cooks and chatted with them about their favorite recipes and best tips. After interviewing dozens of firemen in major hubs, we decided on those who had distinguished themselves not just in terms of the length of service as firemen (Rhett Blankenship, for example, has been with the Dallas-Fire Rescue department for 33 years), but also as cooks, whether they have won cooking competitions or just have as much experience cooking as they do fighting fires. Some have had the pleasure of working with famous chefs like Emeril Lagasse, while others have graduated from prestigious culinary schools and run their own food businesses. It's clear in the end, that these aren't just ordinary firemen — they're America's best firehouse chefs.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Firehouse Chefs Corner: Summertime: The Season For Grilling

Welcome back! Summertime heat, fun and food! As we get ready for another active wildland fire season, it’s also the time to clean the grill and get some quick, healthy and delicious food into our firehouse kitchens.

Today’s fire service is tasked with doing more with less. That is true in many categories, including increased call volume, inspections, training and maintaining the importance of the community meal inside America’s firehouses. To try and meet these ever-increasing challenges and maintain morale amongst our peers it is important to place a high significance and value in eating together.

The kitchen table is where we laugh, train, hold safety tailgate sessions, learn about one another and enjoy stories that seem to gain new versions every time they are told. It is not always possible for us to cook a time-sensitive meal, so it is great to have recipes that are convenient to prepare and that are healthy.

Grilling & BBQ

The summer season is exciting in the culinary world because grilling is easy and makes almost any food taste good. My extended fire service family in the South will tell you that grilling and BBQ are completely different things – and they are right!

Grilling is simply the act of cooking food on a grill, whether it is with gas, propane or charcoal. BBQ is a method of cooking that can involve introducing smoke to infuse the food and add another depth of flavor. The term “low and slow” is synonymous with BBQ and this is not a good choice if you are pressed for time. Today’s BBQ has been kicked up with numerous options of wood to use during the smoking process. We will focus on BBQ and include recipes in future editions of the Firehouse Chefs Corner.

When grilling food, it is important to start with a clean grill and oil your grill grates. Make sure that you do not forget about your grill being left on and end up with a pancake fundraiser to replace the firehouse you just burned down! Marinades, spice rubs and simple citrus are great ways to flavor your proteins or even veggie options like a portobello mushroom burger. Don’t forget that you can grill fruit and veggies as well. Grilling these items helps release flavor and natural sugars, which will enhance your summer dishes even more.

Things are busy for Firehouse Chefs and I am happy to announce my first brick-and- mortar restaurant will be opening in Southern California. The Firehouse Chefs Food + Drink will be located in Bellflower, CA, which is 30 minutes from downtown Los Angeles or from Disneyland in Orange County. The restaurant is also near the Los Angeles County Fire Museum, home of Engine and Squad 51 from the 1970s TV show “Emergency!” I will share more information about our first restaurant and share recipes from our kitchen. Please stay safe and enjoy a blessed summer season.

To close this edition of the Firehouse Chefs Corner, I am sharing my recipe for blackened chicken fajitas. This will be a firehouse and home hit!

BLACKENED CHICKEN FAJITAS WITH CILANTRO LIME MARINADE

Preparation time: 15minutes

These delicious fajitas don’t need a whole lot else to make them shine. That being said, for a complete meal, serve with Eddie’s Saffron Infused Yellow Rice and his Chipotle Guacamole, along with black beans and the usual suspects: salsa, sour cream, shredded cheese, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

3 bunches cilantro, roughly chopped, separated into thirds

Pinch of crushed red pepper (or 1 chipotle pepper, seeded)

Three-quarters to 1 cup olive oil (to taste)

3-4 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced

2 green bell peppers, thinly sliced *

3 Roma tomatoes cut into small wedges

One-half teaspoon ground cumin

One-half teaspoon granulated garlic

(* Switch it up and add 2 diced zucchinis and/or 1 cup of your favorite mushrooms, sliced)

1. Put all of the marinade ingredients in a blender (reserve one-third chopped cilantro for garnish). Start blending on low, then increase speed as the marinade is coming together. While still blending, slowly pour in the olive oil until marinade is well blended and looks like salad dressing. Set aside.

2. With a mallet, pound chicken breasts so that they are tenderized and will cook evenly. Salt and pepper both sides of breasts place breasts in a large Ziploc bag and pour in enough marinade to coat evenly set aside to marinate for 30-60 minutes (the longer you marinate, the stronger the infusion of flavors).

3. Grill the marinated chicken breasts (internal temp 180°) on a BBQ grill until tender yet done. After breasts are done, let rest off of grill for at least 5 minutes (so that chicken retains juices), then cut into thin strips, approximately 2-3 inches long. Set aside.

4. Over medium-high heat, heat olive oil, then add the onions and peppers. Season with salt, pepper, another pinch of crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, and granulated garlic. Sauté over high heat until veggies are cooked but remain al denté. Add the tomatoes and some of the remaining marinade and gently stir to coat.

5. Place the chicken strips on top of the vegetables. Garnish with chopped cilantro and serve with Spanish rice, black beans, salsa, guacamole, sour cream and cheese.


Watch the video: Inside BFD Episode 1 - Firehouse Cooking (October 2022).