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Slow-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon and Peas

Slow-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon and Peas


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Tarragon has a very special affinity with chicken. New potatoes are the only side needed.

Ingredients

  • 1 lemon
  • 1 chicken, weighing at least 3 pounds, 5 ounces
  • 1 large bunch of French tarragon, leaves separated from stalks
  • Salt and pepper
  • Piece of butter
  • Generous ¾ cup heavy cream
  • Generous ¾ cup water for the peas
  • ¾ cup bacon, diced
  • 5 ½ ounces shallots, peeled but left whole
  • 1 ¼ cups hard cider
  • 2 ¾ cups fresh shelled peas (frozen if necessary)
  • 4 Little Gem or Romaine lettuce, quartered
  • Salt and pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Cut the lemon in half. Pare the zest and extract the juice from one half (reserving both the zest and the juice), and put the other half in the cavity of the chicken. Put the tarragon stalks inside the chicken with the lemon and salt and pepper.

Rub the surface of the chicken with the butter, salt, and pepper. Put it in a tight-fitting ovenproof pot, preferably clay, and scatter over the tarragon leaves and lemon zest. Pour on the cream and water, and put the lid on.

Put the chicken in the oven and let roast for 1 ¼ hours. The cooking time can vary, so keep an eye on it: when a thigh is easily pulled off, it is done.The sauce should be reduced to a thick glaze in the pot; if it has separated, take out the chicken and add a little cold water. Season with the reserved lemon juice and more salt and pepper.

While the chicken roasts, prepare the peas. Fry the bacon in a heavy-based skillet at a low heat so the fat runs off. Add the shallots and let fry slowly until soft and lightly golden. Pour in the cider and let reduce by half.

When the chicken is done, and while you are making the sauce, add the peas and lettuces to the bacon and shallots, put a lid on and leave the vegetables to heat through until the lettuces have wilted—this should take about ten minutes.

Season with salt and pepper.

Serve the vegetables in the pan with the chicken, nicely carved, on top. The sauce should be served separately.


Recipe Summary

  • One 4-pound chicken, wing tips, neck and gizzard reserved
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 small onion, thickly sliced
  • 1 small carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth
  • 1/2 pound sugar snap peas
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 pound white mushrooms, cut into thin wedges
  • 1/2 pound oyster mushrooms, stems discarded, large caps halved
  • 1 shallot, thinly sliced
  • 2 large tarragon sprigs, plus 2 teaspoons leaves

Preheat the oven to 400°. Place the chicken in a small roasting pan. Rub 1 tablespoon of the butter over the chicken and season with salt and pepper. Roast for about 1 hour and 20 minutes, rotating the pan once, until the skin is browned and crisp and the chicken is cooked.

Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter. Add the wing tips, neck, gizzard, onion and carrot, season with salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat until browned all over, about 10 minutes. Add the wine and simmer over moderately high heat until reduced to 2 tablespoons, about 4 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat for 20 minutes.

In a large skillet, bring 1/2 inch of water to a boil. Add the sugar snaps and cook over high heat until bright green but still crisp, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside.

Wipe out the skillet and heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the white mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and cook over high heat for 1 minute. Stir and cook over moderate heat until any exuded juices evaporate and the mushrooms start to brown, about 7 minutes. Add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil to the skillet. Add the oyster mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and cook over moderately high heat until browned on the bottom, about 4 minutes. Stir and cook until browned all over, about 3 minutes longer. Add the shallot and cook, stirring, until softened, about 2 minutes. Remove the mushroom mixture from the heat.

When the chicken is done, tilt it to release the juices from the cavity into the pan. Transfer the chicken to a carving board and keep warm. Pour the pan juices into the saucepan with the stock, scraping in any browned bits. Add the tarragon sprigs and simmer the stock over moderate heat for 5 minutes. Strain the jus through a sieve into a small saucepan and skim the fat from the surface. Boil over high heat until reduced to 3/4 cup, about 4 minutes. Stir in half of the tarragon leaves and season with salt and pepper.

Reheat the mushrooms over moderately high heat. Add the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of butter and the blanched sugar snaps and cook, stirring, until heated through. Season with salt and pepper and stir in the remaining tarragon leaves.

Carve the chicken and arrange on 4 plates. Spoon the mushrooms and sugar snaps alongside and pass the jus at the table.


Tarragon & Mustard Chicken

This elegant, seasonal meal highlights rustic French flavors. A combination of crispy-skinned chicken and roasted potatoes and onion is brought together by a luscious pan sauce made with butter, piquant Dijon mustard, and slightly sweet tarragon. The sauce gets extra savoriness from sautéed king trumpet mushrooms (a gourmet variety prized for its hearty stems) and pops of sweetness from fresh peas.

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Heat a small pot of salted water to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Large dice the potatoes. Peel the onion cut into 1-inch-wide wedges. Separate the layers. Shell the peas. Cut the mushrooms crosswise into ¼-inch-thick pieces. Pick the tarragon leaves off the stems discard the stems and finely chop.

Place the potatoes on a sheet pan. Place the onion in a bowl. Drizzle each with olive oil and season with salt and pepper toss to coat. Arrange the seasoned potatoes in a single layer on 1 side of the sheet pan. Roast 10 to 12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Leaving the oven on, remove the roasted potatoes from the oven. Carefully arrange the seasoned onion in a single layer on the other side of the sheet pan. Return to the oven and roast 10 to 12 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven and set aside in a warm place.

While the potatoes roast, place the flour on a plate. Pat the chicken dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. Coat the seasoned chicken in the flour (tapping off any excess) transfer to a plate. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the coated chicken, skin side down. Cook, occasionally pressing down with a spatula, 5 to 6 minutes, or until lightly browned and the skin is crispy. Flip and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned and cooked through. Leaving any browned bits (or fond) in the pan, transfer to a plate. Set aside in a warm place.

While the vegetables roast, add the peas to the pot of boiling water. Cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until bright green and slightly softened. Drain thoroughly and rinse under cold water for 30 seconds to 1 minute to stop the cooking process. Set aside in a warm place.

While the vegetables continue to roast, add the mushrooms to the pan of reserved fond. (If the pan seems dry, add 2 teaspoons of olive oil.) Cook on medium-high, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until slightly softened.

Add the mirin, mustard, and ¼ cup of water to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently and scraping up any fond from the bottom of the pan, 1 to 2 minutes, or until thickened and saucy. Turn off the heat. Add the blanched peas, butter, and half the tarragon. Stir until thoroughly combined and the butter has melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide the roasted vegetables, cooked chicken, and cooked peas, mushrooms, and sauce between 2 dishes. Garnish with the remaining tarragon. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Heat a small pot of salted water to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Large dice the potatoes. Peel the onion cut into 1-inch-wide wedges. Separate the layers. Shell the peas. Cut the mushrooms crosswise into ¼-inch-thick pieces. Pick the tarragon leaves off the stems discard the stems and finely chop.

Place the potatoes on a sheet pan. Place the onion in a bowl. Drizzle each with olive oil and season with salt and pepper toss to coat. Arrange the seasoned potatoes in a single layer on 1 side of the sheet pan. Roast 10 to 12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Leaving the oven on, remove the roasted potatoes from the oven. Carefully arrange the seasoned onion in a single layer on the other side of the sheet pan. Return to the oven and roast 10 to 12 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven and set aside in a warm place.

While the potatoes roast, place the flour on a plate. Pat the chicken dry with paper towels season with salt and pepper on both sides. Coat the seasoned chicken in the flour (tapping off any excess) transfer to a plate. In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the coated chicken, skin side down. Cook, occasionally pressing down with a spatula, 5 to 6 minutes, or until lightly browned and the skin is crispy. Flip and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned and cooked through. Leaving any browned bits (or fond) in the pan, transfer to a plate. Set aside in a warm place.

While the vegetables roast, add the peas to the pot of boiling water. Cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until bright green and slightly softened. Drain thoroughly and rinse under cold water for 30 seconds to 1 minute to stop the cooking process. Set aside in a warm place.

While the vegetables continue to roast, add the mushrooms to the pan of reserved fond. (If the pan seems dry, add 2 teaspoons of olive oil.) Cook on medium-high, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 1 to 2 minutes, or until slightly softened.

Add the mirin, mustard, and ¼ cup of water to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently and scraping up any fond from the bottom of the pan, 1 to 2 minutes, or until thickened and saucy. Turn off the heat. Add the blanched peas, butter, and half the tarragon. Stir until thoroughly combined and the butter has melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide the roasted vegetables, cooked chicken, and cooked peas, mushrooms, and sauce between 2 dishes. Garnish with the remaining tarragon. Enjoy!


Chicken and Pea Traybake

I thought I had exhausted the culinary possibilities of a pack of frozen peas, but my friend, and excellent cook, Alex Andreou, led me by the hand – it does take a leap of faith – to his method of using them, still frozen, as the first layer of a traybake. It’s a life-changer. The peas become soft and sweet in the heat – duller in colour, but so much more vibrant in flavour – and the steam they produce as they bake makes the chicken beautifully tender, its skin crackly and crisp on top.

What’s key here is the size of the roasting tin. I wouldn’t go any smaller – measuring from inside rim to inside rim – than about 38 x 28cm / 15 x 11inches (a little larger is fine) as there needs to be space around the chicken thighs for the magic to happen.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

I thought I had exhausted the culinary possibilities of a pack of frozen peas, but my friend, and excellent cook, Alex Andreou, led me by the hand – it does take a leap of faith – to his method of using them, still frozen, as the first layer of a traybake. It’s a life-changer. The peas become soft and sweet in the heat – duller in colour, but so much more vibrant in flavour – and the steam they produce as they bake makes the chicken beautifully tender, its skin crackly and crisp on top.

What’s key here is the size of the roasting tin. I wouldn’t go any smaller – measuring from inside rim to inside rim – than about 38 x 28cm / 15 x 11inches (a little larger is fine) as there needs to be space around the chicken thighs for the magic to happen.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

As featured in

Photo by David Ellis
  • 90g/3½oz butter
  • large handful fresh tarragon leaves, chopped
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 x 1.75kg/3½lbs free-range chicken
  • 125ml/4½fl oz white wine

Preheat the oven to 220C/200C Fan/Gas 7.

Mash the butter and two-thirds of the tarragon together in a small bowl and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stir in the crushed garlic.

Place the chicken into a roasting tin and rub the herb and garlic butter all over the outside and inside of the chicken.

Pour the wine into the roasting tin and place the tin into the preheated oven. Roast for 15 minutes, then turn the heat down to 190C/170C Fan/Gas 5 and roast for a further 40 minutes, basting the bird from time to time with the juices from the pan, adding a little more wine or water if the tin becomes too dry.

When the chicken is golden-brown and cooked through (pierce the chicken at the thickest part of the thigh - the juices should run clear), turn the oven off and leave the chicken to rest for ten minutes before carving.

Add the remaining chopped tarragon to the roasting juices in the tin, stir well and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

To serve, carve the chicken and pile the slices onto serving plates. Drizzle over pan juices and serve immediately.


Chicken Tarragon

This signature dish is a true one-pan wonder. Good enough to serve at a dinner party!

4 x 125 g (4oz) chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces

(9oz) chestnut mushrooms, sliced

Put the chicken into a bowl and sprinkle over the flour and some seasoning. Mix together. Heat half of the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Brown the chicken for 5min until golden - do this in batches if necessary to stop the chicken from sweating. Remove from pan and set aside.

Add the remaining oil to the pan and fry the mushrooms for 3-5min until nearly cooked through. Return chicken and any juices to the pan. Pour over the wine and simmer for 2min, then stir in the crème fraîche, mustard and most of the tarragon. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5min or until chicken is cooked through.

Stir in the spinach and check the seasoning. Sprinkle over the remaining tarragon and serve immediately with crusty bread to mop up the juices.

Like this? You'll love.

Freeze ahead

Complete recipe but don&rsquot sprinkle with tarragon. Cool, transfer to a freezer-safe container or bag and freeze for up to 1 month. To serve, defrost in fridge and reheat in a pan until piping hot. Complete recipe.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 3.5-4 pound whole broiler-fryer chicken
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¾ cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1 cup sliced shallots
  • 1 cup champagne, sparkling wine, or reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • ½ cup chicken broth
  • 1 ½ cups fresh or frozen peas
  • 1 small lemon, thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 375°F. Rinse chicken cavity pat chicken dry with paper towels. Skewer neck skin to back tie legs to tail. Place chicken in a shallow roasting pan. Brush with butter sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Roast, uncovered, for 1-1/4 to 1-3/4 hours or until drumsticks move easily in sockets and chicken is no longer pink (180°F). Brush with half the honey and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of the tarragon. Roast about 5 minutes more or until the chicken has a golden brown glaze.

Remove chicken from pan and tent with foil. Transfer roasting pan to stove top. Add shallots, champagne, broth, remaining honey, and fresh peas (if using). Simmer, uncovered, about 10 minutes or until juices thicken slightly and shallots are tender. Add frozen peas (if using) and lemon slices to pan. Simmer for 3 to 5 minutes or until heated through. To serve, return chicken to pan, sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon tarragon. If desired, drizzle with remaining honey.


Cooks Notes on This Creamy Chicken and Peas Recipe:

I know some of you have asked questions about food safety when it comes to cooking with chicken. I happen to love talking about this kind of thing, and answering your questions directly. But since this recipe has chicken breast in it, I thought this would be a good time to address two of the most common questions.

How to Safely Prepare Raw Chicken

One is about cleaning up after yourself, and the best way to do that. This is tres important since when you are dealing with chicken you pretty much have to assume that it is contaminated with listeria or salmonella when you cook with it. It is really important that you don&rsquot cross contaminate your other ingredients, kitchen or cooking utensils when you are preparing it.

I like to prep all my ingredients first, then take care of the raw poultry or meat last before I start cooking. So in the case of this recipe, I cut my chives on the clean cutting board and then set them aside in a ramekin before I pulled out the chicken. When I am through with my knife and cutting board I wash it very well with hot soapy water, and then I spray my cutting board and sink with a mild bleach solution to sanitize it. I also microwave my sponge soaked in water for 90 seconds when I am finished with it. (A lot of time I use chicken clean up as an opportunity to replace my sponge with a fresh one.)

I also clean and dry my countertop really well when I am done in case there was any grody pathogen containing meat juice spray. Ew! I have a stainless counter and sink so I use mild bleach solution and paper towels to do this after I work with raw meat or poultry. If you have natural stone or can&rsquot use bleach on the type of counter you have, use a safe cleaner of your choice and then keep in mind that a dry surface is a lot safer than a moist surface. Pathogens love a little water to cruise around on. So once you clean your counter, dry it too!

Can You Safely Cook Raw Meat with Veggies?

The second question I get occasionally is about mixing raw chicken with other ingredients when cooking. Especially for a stir-fry or a recipe like this one with the peas mixed into the sauce. People ask if they should cook the chicken separately and then mix everything at the end. This gets a little grayer so I want to explain this clearly.

When you cook with chicken, it is okay to mix it with other ingredients before it reaches 165ºF. BUT if you do mix it with other ingredients, you have to assume that it or the exuding of its uncooked juice contaminates anything it comes into contact with. So then the chicken and the ingredients it is mixed with need to get to 165ºF to become safe. So it is fine to mix the peas into this before the chicken is cooked through, but you must be sure to that once they are added that you keep cooking until the chicken is cooked through and the peas are at the 165ºF mark.

For this recipe, that happens at 2 to 3 minutes after it comes to a simmer. Remember that simmering sauce is over 200ºF, but it takes a few minutes for the 200ºF sauce to fully permeate the entirety of the frozen peas and the chicken.

How to Avoid Flour Clumps

One more cooks note for you before you run away in fear of chicken for the rest of your lives. The flour is the sauce thickener here. Avoiding lumps is really easy. All you need to know is that to avoid lumps of flour in the sauce, make sure you stir when you add the broth. The starches in the flour gelatinize at about the temperature of boiling, so if they are stirred in and dissolved before it boils you&rsquoll be in the clear!

Okay now on to the yumminess!


This Crispy, Crackly, Juicy Chicken With Cabbage and Peas Is the Perfect One-Pan Dinner

Photo by Joseph De Leo, Food Styling by Micah Marie Morton. Cast Iron Courtesy of Smithey.

I love chicken in all forms. The whole bird, the legs, the wings, the neck, the breast, but especially thighs that are bone-in and skin-on. If you were to look in my fridge right now, you’d almost always find some chicken thighs in there ready to help me throw a hearty meal together with minimal effort.

Dig around a little more in my kitchen, and you’ll find the inspiration for this new recipe. Bag of peas lingering in the freezer? Everlasting head of cabbage in the back of my vegetable drawer? Let’s use those.

As a kid, I ate a lot of cabbage. My mother would make cabbage sabzi all the time, using many different combinations—sometimes peas, sometimes potatoes. She’d always offer a full array of dishes to go with it: roti, salad, rice, and dal. Me? I’m usually scrambling to make a single dish after work—it needs to be a full, satisfying meal in one pot.

This whole dinner comes together in one pan.

Photo by Joseph De Leo, Food Styling by Micah Marie Morton

So we start with chicken pieces, rubbed with a simple, fragrant, savory mixture of cumin, coriander, turmeric, and garlic powder. The combination is a little toasty with a bright yellow color from the turmeric. Don’t worry, though, if you don’t have these exact spices on hand the rub is flexible. Feel free to riff with a little paprika, some onion powder. You could make it with dried chipotle or curry powder too.

Then it all comes down to technique: I have learned over the years that if you want the perfect golden crispy skin on your chicken, you need to start with a cold pan. Add the chicken thighs skin side down and turn the heat to medium. As the pan warms, it will begin to render the fat and brown the skin—resist the urge to fuss with it! When the chicken is finished in the oven, the meat turns out incredibly juicy on the inside, with a perfectly crackly top.

As good as this chicken is, though, what we’re really here for is the cabbage, which sips up all the chicken drippings and becomes a lemony, mildly spiced wonder, slicked in chicken flavor and extra-delicious as leftovers. (Save some for a grain bowl or savory oatmeal and thank me later.)

You’ll finish with the peas. I’ll be honest, as a kid, I’d pick out the peas from my mom’s sabzi, because they’d cooked way too long, turning a dull, briny color. Here, I wanted them to stay their greenest self. Thawing frozen peas under cold water prevents them from developing a white ghost-like skin from temperature shock, and adding them just for the last five minutes of cooking keeps them tender, sweet, and vibrant-looking when you sit down to eat.


Leave a Review

Delicious - highly recommend! I used homemade chicken broth rather than water and roasted chicken on a bed of sweet potatoes, onions and carrots. Used 2% milk instead of heavy cream, gravy was wonderful!

Excellent! Definitely make the sauce with chicken stock, at least partially. Roasted in a cast-iron skillet. And don't fear the blackened outside of the chicken from the mustard.

I have to agree with everyone who says this chicken is amazing. If you are looking at the recipe and thinking it seems too basic and simple to be interesting, you would be wrong, and I encourage you to try it for yourself. I followed the chicken preparation exactly (despite thinking, that's a lot of mustard, isn't it? You don't season the outside of the bird?). I did change the cooking method because I had an almost 8 lb. Purdue roaster chicken (aside note, what the hell do we do to chickens in this country?), so I cooked at 425 for about 50 minutes, and then almost another hour with oven turned down to 350 (total time about 1 hour, 45 min). When making the "gravy," I deglazed with white wine and used chicken stock in place of some of the water. The chicken was crispy outside, moist inside. even the breast, and even as leftovers two days later, and I hate white meat usually. The sauce is perfect, and surprisingly has very little mustard taste. I had a realization and remembrance of being served at a formal dinner what was called "tarragon chicken" by a French chef working for the American NATO residence in Brussels. This is that chicken! Classic. So happy to have found it and to know how to make it myself. Definitely making again, but will be buying an expensive chicken which the recipe deserves.

This is make me groan good. The recipe is simple, straightforward with accessible ingredients and amazing results. The added bonus. the leftovers turned into the best chicken soup I've ever made.

This one is most definitely going into my regular rotation. Very little effort with truly amazing results. I have tried many, many different roast chicken recipes & preparations -this is by far my favorite.

Roast chicken is my least favourite type of food, but all the great reviews this recipe got with the added bonus that it requires little effort I had but to give it a try. And it is true. This was so delicious. I love it

it's perfect for a weekday preparation if you have 50 minutes before it's ready. Followed the recipe, no substitutions. The chicken was so moist, and the flavours just perfect. I didn't have the heart to make the gravy with all the fat on the pan. But next time I'll layer some potatoes under the chicken. Thank you for the reviews!

Fabulous!! I roasted a 6# chicken on convection at 400º with the timer set to 45 minutes. I rotated the pan several times as the chicken was getting really browned. In total, it took about 50-55 minutes to reach 155º (I'm not sure we had the thermometer in the right place) so we took it out. After letting it sit it was done perfectly. The 'gravy' is to die for. I actually simmered the giblets in 1 can of chicken broth for most of the oven time. When it was time to finish the gravy, I added water to the 1 1/4 cup line (after discarding the giblets). I proceeded as directed. Of course we had mashed potatoes.

I just added this easy roasted chicken to my permanent repertoire. I used a light chicken stock instead of water to make the gravy more flavorful. Also, I didn't have heavy cream, so used half and half instead. I think if you wanted to make it richer, you could lift the skin and slather butter under it.

So easy and so delicious! As good as the blue ribbon "My Favorite Roast Chicken Recipe." I made a few adjustments: I trussed the chicken before slathering it with mustard. And I didn't put the sauce through a sieve - I love the brown bits! My chicken was 5 lbs, so I adjusted the amount of ingredients and cooked it for one hour and it was perfect. I looked up "one bunch" of tarragon and estimate that to be about 1 ounce I used at least 1.5 ounces for my 5 lb bird.

I've made this chicken several times, sometimes with the gravy and sometimes without. It's always amazing, always easy. Hands down my favorite roasted chicken recipe. Stuffing the cavity with tarragon is ingenious, we've since done the same with other herbs like thai basil and cilantro and really enjoyed those experiments as well. The tarragon and mustard combination is the best though.

This is possibly the best roast chicken I've ever made! I have made this twice and my boys loved it. Both times, I completely over-cooked the chicken by accident (about 1 hr 20 mins @425), it appeared to be burnt, but that was just the crust of mustard. I flaked off the burnt mustard and underneath was juicy, delicious, tender chicken with crispy skin that we all kept picking at off the cutting board. I didn't even measure the mustard just slathered it on the chicken after sprinkling it all over with salt and pepper. I did put the tarragon in the cavity, although I wouldn't say that the chicken has an overly strong taste of either mustard or tarragon. It's just so delicious, and I didn't even make the sauce - just served with buttered rice and roasted broccoli. Easy! Put it in and burn it!

This was fantastic! The only substitutions I made were to use 2% milk in place of cream and boxed chicken broth in place of water -- it was still delicious. I'll definitely make this for company it's easy and the chicken is so juicy. Served with Brussels sprouts: roasted with a little olive oil, salt, pepper and a splash of balsamic vinegar.

This sauce could make anything taste great, but the chicken itself turned out so crazy good it could stand on it's own! I may never roast a chicken any other way again!

Will definitely make it again. Very easy and great taste. As others have written, the sauce is excellent and makes the dish.

Simple, easy and delicious. I followed the recipe to the letter and it was perfect. I'm definitely adding this to my regular rotation of recipes.

excellent dish, simple, quick and delicious. Instead of mashed potatoes like some recommended, I served new potatoes and a salad. Perfect! I will defintely make this again, next time for a dinner party!

This really is a wonderful and simple method for roasting chicken. I added vegetables as well, everything turned out great. The dijon really makes the gravy something special.

This recipe for a simple roasted chicken might be overlooked a bit on this site, but it's simple and delicious (especially the sauce that it makes). I did substitute chicken broth for the water, and put the roasting pan into the oven as it came to temperature so the bottom of the bird would get a bit of a sear when I put it in. I'll certainly make it again.

Easy & wonderful. Chicken turned out moist & flavorful, gravy was amazing over smashed potatoes with bacon. Highly recommended!

Tasty, easy, delicious. perfect for a weekday meal with no hassle. Roasted veggies and made mashed potatoe. Hubbie raved. but there again he LOVES food. My son, the ɿoodie' loved it also. this is now part of my recipe box.