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Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse


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Alexander’s is part of a small chain of restaurants that include other steakhouse locations in Cupertino, San Francisco and Taipei. Chef Matt Bata’s menu offers dishes that are uniquely influenced by Japanese cuisine. With its a modern and elegant setting, this Pasadena outpost houses a large space with a big bar, three inside dining rooms and a patio area.

Diners have a lot to choose from including an a la carte menu, an eight course-tasting menu ($175) and a Chef’s Table custom designed menu ($200).

Meals start off with a lovely choice of breads including Japanese squid ink baguettes, sweet milk bread and Manchego cheese rolls. In addition, an assortment of honey butter, salted organic butter and rendered beef fat are served with the bread.

Small appetizers include edamame with truffle butter, shishito peppers, uni with tamago and egg salad, oysters, Hamachi shots, dry aged tataki and a variety of salads.

Larger appetizer courses include beef tartare, foie gras, a large charcuterie plate, grilled pork belly and octopus.

For diners not in the mood for steak, Alexander’s offers a “Not Steak” section on the menu with dishes such as black cod, king crab, beef cheeks, short ribs and duck breast.

There is a huge variety of steaks here. The list includes seven Wagyu choices (ranging from $45 to $325), filet mignon, ribeye and bone-in New York steak.

Sides to accompany the main course are creamed taro leaves, mac and cheese, mashed potatoes with negi butter, blue lake beans, Brussels sprouts and fried rice.

Pastry Chef Gail Ramulo serves up unique dessert choices including a creamsicle cheesecake, cookies and cream soufflé, match mint and jasmine rise sorbet and a strawberry fields cremeux. As if dessert wasn’t enough, diners also receive a nice selection of fudge and salted caramel bonbons and a bag of brown butter cinnamon sugar popcorn to take home.

With its range of innovative dishes and wide variety of Wagyu choices, Alexander’s Steakhouse is sure to impress diners, whether steak lovers or not.

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Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Baltimore Magazine.

Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING

Pasadena's Latest Alexander’s Steakhouse Puts A Japanese Spin On The Traditional Steakhouse - Recipes

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Photography by Scott Suchman and spot illustrations by Christine Rösch

Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Food & Drink

We celebrate the local dining scene and those who make it happen.

Edited by Jane Marion
Photography by Scott Suchman and Spot Illustrations by Christine Rösch Written by Lauren Cohen, Jane Marion, and Mike Unger

Every year around this time, for our Best Restaurants roundup, we ask ourselves why any one spot stands out. Is it the food, the décor, the service, the ambiance, or some combination that makes our hearts go pitter patter? But this past year, with the rise of COVID-19, all the rules have changed—and 2020 was a year like no other year we’ve covered. As restaurants have fallen on hard times, we’ve been stirred to celebrate the scene with our first-ever Baltimore Dining Awards. Given what sometimes seemed like insurmountable challenges, we see the hospitality industry anew. And we swear—once we’re all vaccinated—we’ll never again complain about loud music, slow service, or small portions. Starting March 16 of last year, due to COVID-19, Maryland restaurants were mandated to close for indoor service, and then, in the ensuing months, allowed to reopen with a Byzantine series of ever-changing dine-in guidelines and a second wave of crippling closures just before Christmas. All the while, there was a growing demand for takeout. In essence, restaurants had to fight for survival and were forced to find new ways of conducting business, whether doing carryout for the first time, converting to contactless service, or simplifying menus to pare down labor and food costs. Some made the decision to stay shuttered inside while ramping up outdoor dining and giving rise to al fresco Edens with shrubs and string lights. With their boundless creativity, restaurants have continued to inspire us—from elaborate tents and individually heated tables (La Cuchara, Orto) to subscription services (Gracefully Coffee, Larder) to restaurateurs who shelled out beaucoup bucks to add virus-killing lights and new HVAC systems for increased air exchange (Linwoods, Citron).

Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen.

In this reimagined landscape, for restaurants and patrons alike, just showing up—while wearing a mask—was half the battle. In fact, that restaurants continued to operate at all sometimes seemed like a small miracle. So this year, when we asked ourselves, “What stood out on the scene?” we had newfound perspective. More than ever, we appreciate the people and the places that have made the best of it in the hardest of times, from the servers who did their jobs even at risk to themselves to the restaurateurs who kept their businesses afloat by dipping into their personal savings and the neighborhood joints that kept us anchored when the whole world seemed unmoored. Every day we marveled at the chefs who devised dishes sturdy enough to withstand carryout, bartenders bagging craft cocktails to go, and managers working overtime to keep us safe by taking our temperatures before taking our orders. Above all, we salute every server, every bartender and baker, every chef and sous, every dishwasher, every person making the magic happen so we can still enjoy restaurant-quality food, whether dining in at a distance, getting it to-go, or simply serving as a source for pantry staples. From behind your masks—and ours—we see you (and, oh, how much we missed you when you were closed). And to out-of-work hospitality folks, we say keep the faith. We will see you on the other side. In a year when everyone burned brightly, we give props to our entire culinary community, while also singling out a few stars. We also bow our heads to those we’ve lost.

You have our deepest gratitude.

CHARITABLE GIVING


Watch the video: Το Πιθάρι Του Διογένη. Ψητοπωλείο, Κορωπί, Ψητά, Σουβλάκια, Καλαμάκι, Γύρος, Μπιφτέκι (October 2022).