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Rihanna Announces New Fragrance Rogue Love via Twitter Just in Time for the Holidays

Rihanna Announces New Fragrance Rogue Love via Twitter Just in Time for the Holidays


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Since Rihanna coming back to Instagram is reason to celebrate (at least in this office anyway), it’s only fitting her new fragrance announcement comes by way of social media as well. Yesterday the pop star tweeted a campaign image for her newest fragrance, Rogue Love—which featured a photo of her face next to the champagne-colored flacon. While it’s not as scandalous as the previous Rogue images, we haven’t seen the rest of the campaign yet—and come on this is Rihanna—there’s bound to be something scandalous coming up soon, right? “For the ROGUE ladies, my new fragrance #ROGUELOVE is coming your way soon!! #ROGUESEASON,” she said in the tweet.

This will be RiRi’s third Rogue scent (her fourth fragrance overall) after the line debuted last September with the self-titled Rogue women’s perfume and her men’s fragrance, Rogue Man, hitting stores in August. While a release date has yet to be announced we’re pretty sure it will be available before the holidays with both the newest fragrance and men’s cologne taking advantage of the busiest shopping season of the year. Think of it this way—if it comes out soon you, and your loved ones, can all smell like RiRi this Christmas.


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


  • World health authorities declared Covid-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020
  • Since then Britain has endured some of its darkest days since World War Two
  • Scandals and inspirational figures have emerged since the virus first took hold

Published: 22:50 BST, 10 March 2021 | Updated: 00:03 BST, 11 March 2021

On December 21, 2019, a cluster of patients in China were diagnosed with 'pneumonia of an unknown cause'.

Three weeks later came the first death, of a man known to visit wet markets in Wuhan.

A smattering of cases were diagnosed worldwide and on February 11, 2020, the World Health Organisation named the virus Covid-19.

Two weeks later, a man in his 70s became the first British citizen to die from coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation declares the virus a pandemic. Chancellor Rishi Sunak swiftly announces a £30 billion package to boost the economy.

In the U.S., amid fears of a global recession, the Dow Jones industrial average plunges by 5.8 per cent.

In Italy, a nationwide lockdown is imposed and a video of residents of Siena singing from their balconies in a show of solidarity goes viral.

There is panic-buying on British high streets.

Sales of soap have risen by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent.

In Australia, a newspaper prints eight blank sheets for its readers to use as toilet paper.

The UK's death toll is 55, with 1,543 confirmed cases.

At the new daily press briefing, Boris Johnson announces that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts the virus.

Those at special risk should isolate for 12 weeks.

On March 16, Boris Johnson announced that everyone should start social distancing and households must quarantine for a fortnight if someone contracts Covid-19. Less than a month later, he in intensive care being treated for the virus

The Government's original plan had been isolation only for those infected and social distancing for people over 70, but a study by Imperial College London concluded that this would result in 260,000 deaths.

Professor Neil Ferguson, the study lead, said: 'There would be a risk of ICUs being overwhelmed. And that is why we need to act now.'

Watching the briefing will become an evening ritual for millions, making national figures of chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

In York, critical care nurse Dawn Bilbrough is sitting in her car outside a supermarket, in tears.

After a 48-hour shift in intensive care, she has found there is no fruit or veg to buy.

She records her frustration with panic-buyers on her phone: 'You are just stripping the shelves bare of essential foods. it's people like me that are going to be looking after you when you're at your lowest, so just stop it. Please!'

Dawn uploads the video to Facebook and within hours it has been viewed thousands of times.

Schools close until further notice, as do restaurants, pubs and gyms. Rishi Sunak announces the Government will pay up to 80 per cent of wages for workers at risk of being laid off.

The early weeks of the pandemic saw panic-buying on British high streets. Sales of soap rose by 100 per cent, soup by 75 per cent, cold remedies by 64 per cent, rice and noodles by 54 per cent and toilet roll by 45 per cent

In Brixton, a Dutch woman, Annemarie Plas, 36, is making a poster to share on social media to encourage people to 'Clap For Our Carers' on Thursdays.

She had seen something similar in the Netherlands. 'I saw the boost it gave to the front line and the togetherness it brought.'

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room.

Boris Johnson declares a national emergency and tells people they should go outside only to buy food, exercise once a day and go to work — but only if they can't work from home — or they risk being fined.

Globally there are now more than 270,000 cases and 11,000 deaths.

At Balmoral, Prince Charles tests positive for Covid-19. He, Camilla and several of his household staff begin self-isolating.

The first Clap For Our Carers is a great success. At 8pm across Britain, people come to their doorsteps to clap in appreciation for NHS workers.

On the first day of the schools' closure, fitness trainer Joe Wicks starts his 'PE with Joe' YouTube class for children from his sitting room

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's children Charlotte, George and Louis join in from their Norfolk garden.

Boris Johnson, Professor Whitty and Health Secretary Matt Hancock all test positive for coronavirus.

Many radio presenters are now broadcasting from home, turning bedrooms and understairs cupboards into studios.

Radio 4 presenter Sarah Montague says 'there's much better coffee here than at the BBC'.

Boris Johnson appears on the steps of No 11 to clap for NHS workers, looking unwell. The number of cases globally passes a million.

Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.'

As Captain Tom Moore sets off, his son-in-law Colin says: 'Hannah and I will give you £1 per lap, so why not see if you can do a hundred by your 100th birthday?'

In a televised broadcast, the Queen addresses the nation from Buckingham Palace: 'While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour.'

The Queen then echoes the words of Vera Lynn, encouraging those 'feeling a painful sense of separation from their loved ones' to take comfort in the fact that 'we will meet again'.

The broadcast is filmed by a single cameraman wearing PPE.

Boris Johnson's symptoms have worsened. He is admitted to St Thomas' Hospital and given oxygen.

On April 5, Hannah Ingram, of Bedfordshire, says to her 99-year-old father, who is recovering from a fall: 'Why don't you bring your walker outside today, Dad? You can walk up and down the driveway.' Her father, Captain Sir Tom Moore, will go on to inspire the nation, earning a knighthood along the way

Donald Trump says: 'All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader.'

The BBC publishes a diagram of how power would transition should the Prime Minister die. Newspaper editors start preparing obituaries.

The Prime Minister is moved to intensive care. Downing Street announces that Dominic Raab will deputise.

The Nightingale Hospital in London's ExCel Centre receives its first patients. One of several emergency hospitals, it was built with military help in nine days.

Intensive Care Units are struggling to cope.

Shaan Sahota, a London doctor, writes: 'I don layers of stifling PPE to enter into 'Covid zones'. I trawl through medical notes to find my patients in a time before they were paralysed and sedated and put on a ventilator, to catch a glimpse of the person they are.'

Captain Tom Moore's fundraising daily walks have caught the public imagination. He is interviewed by the BBC, having raised £35,000 for the NHS.

Asked if he has advice for those in lockdown, he says: 'Tomorrow will be a good day. Tomorrow you will maybe find everything will be much better than today. My today was all right and my tomorrow will certainly be better.'

#TomorrowWill BeAGoodDay starts to trend on Twitter.

The Prime Minister's top aide, Dominic Cummings, is spotted in Barnard Castle, 30 miles from his Durham home, having driven there from London.

At 11.45pm, radar readings show there are no aircraft flying over the British Isles. Fewer flights, fewer cars and fewer factories open have resulted in a decline in pollution.

The canals of Venice are so clean Venetians can see fish, the skies over Chinese cities are clear and the Himalayas are visible from Delhi, 400 miles away.

The RSPB reports an increase in the number of people sharing sightings of birds and animals they have never seen before.

But a spokesman adds: 'All these sightings are not the result of wildlife becoming more numerous. but of more people simply paying attention to what's around them.'

After seven nights in hospital, three in intensive care, Boris Johnson is discharged. His father Stanley insists his son should rest before getting back to work: 'He almost took one for the team. We have got to make sure we play the game properly now.'

Boris Johnson's top aide Dominic Cummings held a rare press conference in May after he was spotted in at Barnard Castle. He says the trip was made as a test run, so he could check his eyesight before the return journey to London

(Three months later, when all but 'essential travel' is banned, Mr Johnson senior will fly to Greece to check on his holiday house.)

Temporary mortuaries are being built around the country. The Bishop of Norwich, dedicating one, says: 'My earnest prayer is that this facility will not be needed but, if it is, that the light, hope and peace of the Risen Christ will be felt there.'

The death toll in UK hospitals reaches 14,576. PPE supplies are running out, so doctors and nurses are asked to wear plastic aprons instead of full-length gowns. More than 50 front-line NHS workers have died to date.

Animals are reclaiming the world's streets. Mountain goats are walking around Llandudno and herds of fallow deer graze in an East London housing estate.

The number of people making video calls via Zoom has risen by 2,000 per cent since January.

Oxford University starts the first human testing for a Covid-19 vaccine. And in a White House briefing, President Trump suggests injecting disinfectant as a treatment against coronavirus, saying: 'I'm not a doctor. But I'm, like, a person that has a good you-know-what.'

As people struggle to find ways to keep fit, Mr and Mrs Phillips of London report that they have achieved the equivalent of climbing Everest by walking up their stairs.

Mrs Phillips reached the summit 30 minutes before her husband.

Neil Ferguson, dubbed 'professor lockdown,' resigned from the Government's SAGE committee after it was emerged a married woman visited his home during lockdown

Boris Johnson claims the UK is 'past the peak' of Covid-19.

Captain Tom celebrates his 100th birthday.

He has become the oldest artist ever to reach No 1 in the charts, with his cover of You'll Never Walk Alone.

So far he has raised over £28million.

Professor Neil Ferguson resigns from the Government's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) after it emerges that a married woman visited his home in lockdown.

He issues a statement saying: 'I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms. I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing.'


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