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The Pulse on Pulses: Why You Should Be Eating Beans and Lentils

The Pulse on Pulses: Why You Should Be Eating Beans and Lentils


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Reasons why you should participate in the “International Year of Pulses”

Pulses, a unique subset within the legume family, are the dried seed of a legume. From chickpeas to lentils to dried peas, you’ve probably seen pulses at salad bars before. Click ahead to see why you should be eating more of these fruits during the "International Year of Pulses."

The Pulse on Pulses: Why You Should Be Eating Beans and Lentils

Pulses, a unique subset within the legume family, are the dried seed of a legume. Click ahead to see why you should be eating more of these fruits during the "International Year of Pulses."

Anti-Aging Antioxidants

Legumes in general contain antioxidants, which can help to ward off disease and aging as well as cell damage.

Complex Carbohydrates

The carbs a pulse is made of are mostly fiber and starch. This means that they’re good at preventing an often undesired spike in blood sugar levels.

Gluten-Free

If you’re leading a gluten-free lifestyle, you’ll be happy to know that pulses contain none of this increasingly unpopular protein.

Less Water

On average, it takes around 43 gallons of water to produce one pound of pulses. Other legumes, like peanuts and soybeans, require much more water to produce. Peanuts come in around 368 gallons per pound and soybeans need 216 gallons.

Nitrogen-Fixing

Pulses naturally fix nitrogen in soil, reducing their environmental impact. This process results in a much smaller carbon footprint compared to crops like corn while also helping to increase soil quality.

Protein Power

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Per 100 grams, pulses contain anywhere from 13 to around 26 grams of protein. Lower in fat than their peanut and soybean cousins, this tasty food source can function as a great way for vegans and vegetarians to get in much-needed protein.

World Recognition

The developing world relies heavily on pulses, but the Global Pulse Confederation notes that “there is a massive gap in productivity between pulse crops inside and outside the developing world. With the introduction of improved varieties and promotion of better management techniques, pulse crops can continue to be an excellent choice for farmers in the developing world.”


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.


UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The UK government has updated its dietary guidelines. The newly revised EatWell Guide recommends people eat more plants, get more of their protein from beans and pulses and cut down on processed and red meat. It's a good step forward towards encouraging healthier, more sustainable diets.

UK Government: ‘Eat More Beans and Pulses’

The EatWell Guide is a policy tool used to define government recommendations on eating healthily and achieving a balanced diet. It is a visual guide in the shape of a plate, which shows the different food groups and illustrates healthy food options, as well as the recommended balance between them. Its advice has remained practically unchanged for 20 years, but this month's update now explicitly aims to help people choose food that is more sustainable.

How does it do that? The EatWell Guide proposes we should be eating mostly plant-based foods and less animal products. Fruits, vegetables and starchy foods, like pasta and potatoes, take up most of the plate – according to EatWell these foods should be the source of 76% of our daily calories. When it comes to protein, the recommendation is to choose more beans and pulses and less processed and red meat. The amazing benefits of pulses are highlighted in the guidance too. Beans, peas and lentils are presented as good alternatives to meat because they’re naturally very low in fat, and they’re high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals.

At Eating Better, we have long called for official healthy eating advice to be updated for sustainability. By taking steps to engage with sustainability within EatWell, the Department of Health and Public Health England is demonstrating leadership in promoting system-wide change to tackle obesity and diet related ill health. More could be done to integrate sustainability within the Eatwell guidelines, for instance by providing guidance on how to choose food that has been farmed sustainably, but this is a good start.

The principles of EatWell will be applied to menus served by hospitals and schools. They'll form the basis of healthy eating education and spread the message about the benefits of eating pulses. Our hope is that the new guidelines will also find resonance in farming policies, and the production of fruit, vegetables and pulses will be adequately promoted in the UK to ensure it can meet the demands of a healthier population.



Comments:

  1. Morris

    Excellent communication good)))

  2. Brazahn

    Not bad

  3. Baramar

    I do not know what kind of weapons the third world war will be fought with, but the fourth - with sticks and stones.

  4. Aram

    the excellent and timely message.

  5. Jervis

    It is error.

  6. Faukus

    In my opinion it is obvious. I will refrain from comments.



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