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Pig Out on a Whole Body Pig Feast in New York City

Pig Out on a Whole Body Pig Feast in New York City


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Chef Tomas Curi cooks up a snout-to-tail feast at Corsino

Chef Tomas Curi shows diners how to butcher a pig.

We’ve all heard it before: "I’m so hungry I could eat a horse," but what about an entire pig? Chef Tomas Curi took on that challenge, constructing a four-course meal from unique pork cuts during a private dinner in June at Cantina Corsino Italiana. But you didn’t miss out. Event-planning company SideTour will be hosting the event again with Curi July 26.

Curi, the head chef of Corsino in Manhattan’s West Village neighborhood, is cooking up a meal for the evening based completely on different cuts from the Mangalitsa pig. The pig is known for its marbling and unique taste, allowing Curi to use the meat in a variety of ways.

Curi starts the meal by hanging the pig and teaching his guests how to properly butcher the animal. He then uses the specific cuts in each course, starting with crostinis with pâté made from the head of the pig, then pasta ragù made from pork shoulder, followed by a range of desserts.

"You always think of butchering as gruesome," said Andrea Duchon, editorial lead for SideTour, who attended the event in June. "But Curi had so much more of an artisan’s approach."

The dinner at Corsino has seating for 12 guests, with only four seats left. For $95, guests will feast on the pork-laden meal along with unique wine pairings for each course.

Sean Flynn is a Junior Writer for The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @BuffaloFlynn


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.


The 10 Dishes That Made My Career: Vivian Howard of Chef & the Farmer

“I’m not going to lie: Sometimes I would like to wake up on a Sunday and decide where to get brunch,” says Vivian Howard, star of the PBS show A Chef’s Life. Instead of queuing up for eggs Benedict, Howard—who also runs the kitchen at Chef & the Farmer, in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Kinston—spends the day off cooking for her family.

What middle-of-nowhere Kinston lacks in hip, cortado-dispensing cafes, it more than makes up for with soulful culinary traditions. The family-run farms and time-honored culinary rituals of the region are what inspired her to pursue the PBS project.

“The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf,” says the native of rural Deep Run, where her parents were tobacco and hog farmers. 𠇏rugal farmers ate vegetables and grains, with meat dotted in as a condiment. I want the rest of the nation to understand our history and the wisdom, skills, and passion of our people.”

The South isn’t all fried chicken and meatloaf.

Storytelling was always part of Howard’s long-term game plan. After a miserable stint in advertising, she set out to become a food writer, “working in New York kitchens as a means to get closer to the stories.” But the restaurants—Scott Barton’s Voyage, Wylie Dufresne’s wd

50, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s Spice Market�ptured Howard’s imagination with their �maraderie and fast-paced atmosphere,” so she squashed the journalist dream to become a cook.

Through A Chef’s Life, which snagged a Peabody Award earlier this year, Howard immerses herself in regionalਏoodways, proving that Southern-focused reality television can have more depth than Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. When she’s not regaling viewers with tales of tomato sandwiches and butter beans, she reimagines Southern cuisine by serving the likes of rice-crusted catfish and pecan-date-country ham cheese balls at Chef & the Farmer, where her husband, Ben, is the GM.

Howard didn’t think she𠆝 come back home after amenity-fueled New York living, but when her parents wooed with the promise of helping back a restaurant of their own, Chef & the Farmer was born in a onetime mule barn in 2006.

“We scratched and clawed our way to make it on the air. I’m still reeling from the attention people are paying,” Howard says of the show, which is about to wrap its second season. 𠇋ut it doesn’t change my life on a daily basis, except I do most of my work during the day now since my guests want to talk to me at night.”

Chances are those conversations revolve around food. From empanadas that quelled homesickness, to memorably overcooked chicken, here are 10 of the dishes that have inspired Howard’s belief that food and storytelling are forever intwined.