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Best Mountain-Side Eats for Ski Season

Best Mountain-Side Eats for Ski Season


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8 top spots to fuel up and chill out slope-side this season

The onset of ski season evokes images of wood-burning fireplaces, bubbling Jacuzzis, puffy parkas, and plaid woolen blankets strewn loosely over clubby chalet couches. Die-hard boarders and casual bunny slopers eagerly anticipate opening day runs in resorts like Snowmass, Alta, Killington, and Aspen. But ski season also has the capacity to ignite a fire in the belly. Piping bowls of meaty chili and stews, rich fondues, spiked hot chocolates, and thick, grilled sandwiches all feel earned after logging a morning on backcountry trails and steep moguls.

Click here to see the Best Mountain-Side Eats Slideshow.

And we’ve logged hours finding the best slope-side sustenance, from the decadent pots of fondue and lobster mac and cheese served by floor-to-ceiling windows at the Cliff House Restaurant in Stowe to the Utah trout and local cheeses at Montage Deer Valley’s sleek and modern mountain lodge restaurant Apex. But it takes more than just fantastic comfort food to be a select mountain-side eatery, they’ve got to offer awe-inspiring views of fellow skiers and boarders flying down the slopes outside. There is no better way to enjoy that warming French onion soup or savory smoked trout dip, than by gazing out oversized windows on the falling snow.

And then inside, the best mountain-side stops are welcoming and cozy with roaring fireplaces and open kitchens, oversized leather chairs and a bar fully equipped to serve hot toddies and other classic cold-weather drinks.

After careful consideration, then, here are some of our favorite spots to duck off the slope and refuel. Whether it’s a quick midday pit stop or a lingering end-of-day respite, they come complete with the best mountain-side views, a festive ski season vibe, and, of course, the best food around.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.


Making Perfect Steaks | The Food Lab

This week we're getting back to the basics, exploring a few of the simplest, yet most persistent points of contention amongst steak-fryers and grillers.

If you've been a longtime reader of the Food Lab, you've already got your head around a few of the basics, like why you should cut against the grain (it makes for more tender bites), or why you need to rest your steak after cooking it (keeps it nice and juicy). If you're really clever, you'll figure out how to apply some of the principles outlined in our Perfect Prime Rib recipe and tests on how often you should flip a burger to ensuring that your steak is cooked perfectly evenly from edge to center (hint: warm it up first, flip it over and over as it cooks). Want the ultimate in even cooking and tenderness? Try cooking it in a beer cooler, using this sous-vide steak primer for temperature guidelines.

But, if being married has taught me anything, no matter how much of an expert you are in a given subject, there's always more to learn. Take memorizing dates, for example. Apparently just anniversaries aren't good enough—I've also got to find room in my head for birthdays. Luckily, hers falls two days before Dumpling's (which is today!). This makes it both an easy date to remember, and a very hard date to remember on time. D'oh! Happy belated birthday, dear.

Anyhow, today, we move on to discuss a few more of my favorite steak related things: salting, poking, and searing, in that order.